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The Klaus Knopper Interview

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Linux
Interviews

A couple of weeks ago I approached Klaus Knopper (Founder of Knoppix) via email asking whether he would be interesting in answering a few questions about the Knoppix project.

Knoppix is one of the oldest distributions, yet it is as relevant today as it was when it was first released.

Without further ado here are the questions I put to Klaus and the answers that he gave.

Knoppix has been around for a long long time. When was the first release and why was it created?

In 1999 I tried the Linux-based "business card rescue CDs" which were available as a gimmick from various vendors at computer expos (Knoppix wasn't the first Live CD, there were many others before).

If you can fit a shell and rescue tools on a 20MB medium, it should be possible to have a complete working desktop and development environment on a full sized CD, I thought, and from then on experimented in creating Linux installations that don't need an immutable computer system and harddisks to start, which means I needed to find ways for autoconfiguration, and later a possibility for overwriting files that come from a read-only medium.

full interview




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