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ArmA 3 kicks massive ass!

Filed under
Gaming

There are seven reasons why the Czech people are the best nation in the world. They have the most beautiful women, they are extremely polite and docile, they have decent cars, Jozin z Bazin, Operation Flashpoint, ArmA 2, and now ArmA 3. This is the latest first person shooter game by Bohemia Interactive, or should I say, a war simulation, because it's nothing like all those stupid arcades out there.

Just a few days after it was released, I purchased the game, Deluxe Edition, at USD64.99. Even though this is a hefty price, I wanted to support both Bohemia Interactive as well as Steam for their gallant Linux efforts. Now, while the game release is official, it's still sort of beta. For example, the singleplayer campaign is missing, and will only be launched in a few weeks. There are all sorts of glitches and such, but that's not important. What we want is awesome, realistic war. And when it comes to that, no one deliver like the Czechs.

I was slightly apprehensive that the massive 9GB game might not work well on my primary gaming rig. While it happily ran ArmA 2 at the highest settings without any problems, it's been a couple of years since, so perhaps there could be new issues. Luckily no. ArmA 3 auto-detection set all the details to high or very high, resulting in about 40 FPS on average, which is quite respectable. We are talking a i5-powered desktop with 16GB RAM and Nvidia GTX 570 card. Still good for all the fun, all the way. Although you can do a lot of optimization, but that's a separate article.

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