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No Changes in Tux Machines

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Still waddling the waddle

Hello World

As Susan kindly explained just earlier today, I am taking over as the main maintainer of Tux Machines. I have been a GNU/Linux proponent and advocate for over a decade and 7 years ago I became a vocal opposer of patent deals with Microsoft, not just software patents (which I had campaigned against well before that). This won't be the focus of Tux Machines though; I already write about this subject (amongst others) over at techrights.org, which unofficially turned 7 just two days ago.

To longtime readers of Tux Machines there will be no substantial change. I was motivated to buy the site simply because Tux Machines had been my favourite site for years and seeing that it could no longer be updated frequently enough, I decided to step in and help. As part of my daily workflow I have been following FOSS and GNU/Linux news very closely since 2005 (posting news picks in USENET, techrights.org, Twitter, identi.ca, Diaspora, etc.), so keeping this site up to date would be a sustainable activity for a long time to come.

The purpose of this site is simple; all I wish to do is help readers find news of interest, filtering out unimportant cruft while grouping related news so as to provide contextual information. I will adhere to Susan's format and make use of her sources.

Susan is still around and she can be contacted although wedding preparations are likely to limit/restrict her online activities. I wish to take this opportunity to thank Susan for sharing tens of thousands of stories with me as well as millions of other people. Susan's work has had an immeasurable impact on the world and we ought to be eternally grateful for her sacrifice of time.

I will keep the spirit of this site and try to improve, where possible, the flow of information. I can be reached on roy at schestowitz dot com in case someone wishes to drop a note.

Warm regards,

Roy

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Thanks

Thanks for keeping the site alive. Tux Machines is easily my favorite Linux news site.

Agreed

I know that feeling. The stories chosen here have always been most relevant.

Thanks for Keeping Tuxmachines Alive and Going

As a "Newbie" Linux user (+/- 2years) Tuxmachines has been a great site for me to find what I was looking for and many things I didn't know that I wanted or needed.

I was a bit saddened when it was announced that it was for sale, as it has been my homepage for the last 1 1/2 years, and my "GOTO" site to start looking for what I need.

I want to Thank Susan for all her work and Welcome Roy and his effort to keep up the site that has provided so much to me.

Sincerely

David

Thanks

Thanks, David, both for the kind words and for the touching story. I'll do my best to keep you informed daily.

Oops

Pardon the above. It was posted by me -- not Susan -- I just forgot to log out.

If

Just think, if that is the biggest mistake you make today, You are in for a great Day. LOL

No Changes?

One of the advantages of Tuxmachines was that it was a clean, light news site. Not many fancy images, pure content.

The white background and the light borders of the old theme underlined these approach.

This seems to have gone now, so goodby Tuxmachines.

Observations

Differences in image size are creating layout problems, with images spilling out of their container's border. At the server, ImageMagick can help by standardizing image sizes.

The current large size of the images is rather distracting and impinges on the information density of the page. Ars Technica offers a nice example of unobtrusive use of images to enhance appearance without too much impact on density.

I'd offer that reducing image sharpness and saturation can also make a more pleasing display.

Also, the hard borders around the whole article excerpt seem too rigid. I'd suggest that just a separator between articles might be more pleasing. Some can be found at Openclipart, here: http://openclipart.org/search/?query=separator

You can find a few more under "decoration" at Openclipart.

Will you still be contributing to Diaspora, with this new venture?

Thanks

Thanks for these suggestions. I have taken note of them and will take action on my days off work.

Regrading Diaspora, I am still posting there. I will try to manage everything as before without burning out.

Today, with the gradient fill

Today, with the gradient fill within the boxes, things look much better. I'd caution you about the pattern fill being used behind text; it does interfere with readibility and remember, the user may have set a different text size than your default.

Advice

The good advice from you was used; I looked up the graphics you had suggested, but it wasn't suitable for this page topology (separators have nothing convenient to facilitate them). The background is a sort of xmas-y thing (snowflakes), probably temporary. I'm still experimenting a bit with the CSS. I might upgrade to new Drupal (v7 or v8) pretty soon, so themes are likely to break, though I'll try to fit/retrofit the original one. This is how the site has looked since I first landed on it.

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