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Point Linux 2.2 - Is there life on Mars?

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Linux

Point Linux 2.2 is a welcome blast from the past with the way it looks. It reminds you of how good things were back when Gnome 2 was prominent.

The performance of Point Linux on the Toshiba Satellite Pro that I am using is excellent.

I didn't come across any issues whilst using Point Linux and the experience has been really good.

There is one thing I would like to add though. If I could go back to any point in time in my past then it would be either the 1970s or the 1980s.

I like the 1970s because in my head it would be like "Life on Mars" and I like the 1980s because I have lived through it once already and life seemed easier back then.

The truth is the reason why I would be happy back in the 1980s is because I know what happened and during my 1980s nothing bad happened.

The same can be said of Ubuntu back at version 10.04. I used it. I remember it well. It was great, it was stable and I really liked it and I know nothing bad happened whilst I used it.

Is that a good enough reason to go back in time?

Unity, Cinnamon, Gnome 3. They have all added something new and they are clearly the future of Linux. (Ok KDE as well, if you must).

Point Linux is like a time machine. It gives me back a really good operating system which works in a way I used to work. Do I still want to work that way? I am not quite sure.

Taking it on face value, Point Linux is a really nice operating system that performs well, is easy enough to navigate and has no real major issues. If that is what you need then it is well worth a shot.

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