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Tux Machine's editorial picks are...

too many links

Take a look at this for example. http://i.imgur.com/MQ21f8r.png way too many links and it actually keeps going if I scroll down.
No one is going to read all of that. People should be easily able to recognise new content on the website.

Front page

Is shortened summaries, especially of such posts, were to appear in the front page, would that be an improvement? It would necessitate more clicking (to expand the post) but it would save space.

front page

Yes definitely Smile The short summary can include small headlines "New releases from so and so' and "Learn new tricks to fix this and tips to do that" or "New howtos for...." or "Guides for compiling this and that and migrating from software A to B etc.." then when the readers click 'read more', they see the full set of links.

And again, thank you for your dedication towards making the website more user friendly Smile

Shortening

I will be shortening long posts with many links from now on.

the leftovers

the leftovers thing with many links is way too annoying in my opinion.

Suggestion

Do you suggest that they don't get posted at all or just not in this current form?

Not in it's current form.

Not in it's current form. Perhaps make a separate page for "tutorials", or left overs. call it something like 'back news' or short news. And then keep the major articles on the front page Smile

(and thank you for replying)

Feeds

The problem is, how will people subscribe to those pages or be made aware of their existence? it would basically fragment the flow, wouldn't it? Some sites like FAIR.org do this (splitting to sections) and it complicates syndication.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (firmware-nonfree, golang-github-seccomp-libseccomp-golang, and ruby-kramdown), Fedora (kernel, libmetalink, and nodejs), openSUSE (go1.13, perl-XML-Twig, and thunderbird), Oracle (kernel, libvncserver, and thunderbird), Red Hat (kernel-rt and python-paunch and openstack-tripleo-heat-templates), SUSE (dpdk, google-compute-engine, libX11, webkit2gtk3, xen, and xorg-x11-libX11), and Ubuntu (nss and samba).

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (dovecot and roundcube), Fedora (python36), Gentoo (chromium), openSUSE (ark, firefox, go1.13, java-11-openjdk, libX11, wireshark, and xen), Red Hat (bind and kernel), SUSE (libreoffice and python36), and Ubuntu (dovecot and software-properties).

  • Microsoft August 2020 Patch Tuesday fixes 120 vulnerabilities, two zero-days
  • Nearly Every Android Phone Has Over 400 Vulnerabilities

    Many smartphones rely on third-party Digital Signal Processor (DSP) chips, which is basically a system on a chip. The system abilities include charging capabilities, such as “quick charge,” multimedia, audio features, image processing, and voice data.

  • Intel Publishes 18 New Security Advisories For 52 Vulnerabilities

    It is Intel's August 2020 disclosure day with 18 new advisories being issued for covering 52 vulnerabilities. Intel engineers uncovered around half of those 52 vulnerabilities internally while the rest were found by external security researchers.

Ulauncher - Ground control to Major Tux

Application launchers are an interesting phenomenon. They are both an amazing piece of software and also something that most people won't ever really need - or understand. They sit in the twilight zone between the Internet and your system menu. Which is what makes them so difficult to design and implement correctly. The best example of a successful tool of this nature is Krunner. It's integrated into the Plasma desktop, and it works well. Practical, versatile, extensible, full of goodies. But then, when I try to think of other candidates, my brain doesn't really throw any easy answers. Various Linux desktop did and do attempt to offer smart menus, but none of them really have that almost-AI super-tool. This led me on a pilgrimage, and what I found is a program called Ulauncher. Stop, testing time. Read more

today's howtos

Cosmo Communicator Review: the dual boot pocket PC phone

Around the turn of the century, smartphones came in many clever and innovative shapes and sizes. For about 10 years, we lost that innovation to rectangular touch screen slabs, but now some of that innovation is coming back. The Cosmo Communicator is a good example. It’s an Android smartphone with a real physical keyboard, a clam-shell hinge to open it up, and an external screen. It even allows you to partition the storage area and install full Linux for a dual boot experience. The Cosmo Communicator is 171.4mm long, 79.3mm wide, and 17.3mm thick. It’s not a small device. The weight is 326g, so it’s not light either. It’s got a 4220mAh battery with fast charging, 5.99″ FHD 2160×1080 pixel main display, 1.91″ external OLED touch display, 24Mp external camera with LED flash, and 5Mp front-facing video call camera. It supports all of the GSM, CDMA, and 4G LTE radios and is also available in a Verizon version or Japan version for those different frequencies. You’ve got dual nano-SIM card slots and eSIM support as well. It comes with Android 9.0 installed, but now with recent updates, we can also install a special version of Debian Linux. Sailfish might work too. Read more