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Tux Machine's editorial picks are...

too many links

Take a look at this for example. http://i.imgur.com/MQ21f8r.png way too many links and it actually keeps going if I scroll down.
No one is going to read all of that. People should be easily able to recognise new content on the website.

Front page

Is shortened summaries, especially of such posts, were to appear in the front page, would that be an improvement? It would necessitate more clicking (to expand the post) but it would save space.

front page

Yes definitely Smile The short summary can include small headlines "New releases from so and so' and "Learn new tricks to fix this and tips to do that" or "New howtos for...." or "Guides for compiling this and that and migrating from software A to B etc.." then when the readers click 'read more', they see the full set of links.

And again, thank you for your dedication towards making the website more user friendly Smile

Shortening

I will be shortening long posts with many links from now on.

the leftovers

the leftovers thing with many links is way too annoying in my opinion.

Suggestion

Do you suggest that they don't get posted at all or just not in this current form?

Not in it's current form.

Not in it's current form. Perhaps make a separate page for "tutorials", or left overs. call it something like 'back news' or short news. And then keep the major articles on the front page Smile

(and thank you for replying)

Feeds

The problem is, how will people subscribe to those pages or be made aware of their existence? it would basically fragment the flow, wouldn't it? Some sites like FAIR.org do this (splitting to sections) and it complicates syndication.

More in Tux Machines

Debian and Devuan News

Gaming News

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

  • Samba flaw opens Linux systems to remote exploit

    A vulnerability in Samba, the standard Windows interoperability suite of programs for Linux and Unix, can be exploited remotely to gain access to Linux machines that have port 445 exposed.

  • UK cyber chief says directors are devolving responsibility for hacks {sic} [iophk: "a step towards banning Microsoft, yet the article closes with Microsoft talking points"]

    Ciaran Martin, the head of the agency's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), said it is unacceptable for boards to plead ignorance about the threat from cyber attacks.

  • Ransomware and the Internet of Things

    But it is a system that's going to fail in the "Internet of things": everyday devices like smart speakers, household appliances, toys, lighting systems, even cars, that are connected to the web. Many of the embedded networked systems in these devices that will pervade our lives don't have engineering teams on hand to write patches and may well last far longer than the companies that are supposed to keep the software safe from criminals. Some of them don't even have the ability to be patched.

    Fast forward five to 10 years, and the world is going to be filled with literally tens of billions of devices that hackers can attack. We're going to see ransomware against our cars. Our digital video recorders and web cameras will be taken over by botnets. The data that these devices collect about us will be stolen and used to commit fraud. And we're not going to be able to secure these devices.

  • Kodi 17.3 Security Update Patches Infamous Subtitle Hack, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Crash
    The second stable point release of the major Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center was launched the other day, on May 24, 2017, but it was missing some binary add-ons, so Martijn Kaijser announced today Kodi 17.3.
  • Samba vulnerability brings WannaCry fears to Linux/Unix