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Tux Machine's editorial picks are...

Good as they are
54% (73 votes)
Need improving
10% (13 votes)
Too many
6% (8 votes)
Too few
3% (4 votes)
Need commentary
28% (38 votes)
Total votes: 136

too many links

Take a look at this for example. http://i.imgur.com/MQ21f8r.png way too many links and it actually keeps going if I scroll down.
No one is going to read all of that. People should be easily able to recognise new content on the website.

Front page

Is shortened summaries, especially of such posts, were to appear in the front page, would that be an improvement? It would necessitate more clicking (to expand the post) but it would save space.

front page

Yes definitely Smile The short summary can include small headlines "New releases from so and so' and "Learn new tricks to fix this and tips to do that" or "New howtos for...." or "Guides for compiling this and that and migrating from software A to B etc.." then when the readers click 'read more', they see the full set of links.

And again, thank you for your dedication towards making the website more user friendly Smile

Shortening

I will be shortening long posts with many links from now on.

the leftovers

the leftovers thing with many links is way too annoying in my opinion.

Suggestion

Do you suggest that they don't get posted at all or just not in this current form?

Not in it's current form.

Not in it's current form. Perhaps make a separate page for "tutorials", or left overs. call it something like 'back news' or short news. And then keep the major articles on the front page Smile

(and thank you for replying)

Feeds

The problem is, how will people subscribe to those pages or be made aware of their existence? it would basically fragment the flow, wouldn't it? Some sites like FAIR.org do this (splitting to sections) and it complicates syndication.

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