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KDE Look and Feel for Java Preview

Filed under
KDE

Sekou Diakite has released an alpha version of a KDE Look and Feel for Java. This is an interesting step forward in Linux/Unix desktop integration since Java applications can now use the KDE/Qt libraries for drawing Java widgets and even directly use existing KDE widgets such as the file or color choosers. See the webpage for further details of this accomplishment including future plans and, of course, screenshots.

How this is done ?

  • A KDE application is created offscreen and never showed.
  • Everytime swing needs to draw a widget :
    • The equivalent widget is drawn to a QPixmap via the offscreen KDE application (The drawing is done by QStyle methods),
    • The QPixmap is converted to a Java BufferedImage,
    • Swing draws this image as the widget background.

More Details.

Source.

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