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Aqua Computer Premium water cooling kit

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Hardware
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Germany is arguably the country with the fastest and strongest growing water cooling products market on the planet. I do not know and can not possibly guess what caused this kind of growth, but it is most evident. I can think of at least 30 German water cooling product manufacturers in a single minute. one of the most reputable manufacturers in Germany for their quality and ease of use is Aqua Computer. Founded during the Spring of the year 2001, the company is dedicated to the research, assembly and manufacture of water cooling products. Their Aqua Premium kit is under the microscope today. Let us see what the Aqua Computer has to offer the hardware enthusiast.

The design of most German water cooling kits relies on low flow rates. This kit is no exception from other German manufacturers. The German water cooling 'standard' primarily uses 3/8" inside diameter tubing, instead of the 1/2" inside diameter used mostly in the USA and the UK. This kit steps down a little more, using 5/16" tubing for liquid flow. Considering the rest of the components provided, it surely relies on finesse a lot more than brute force and flow rates.

The kit comes in a very large box for a liquid cooling kit, measuring over half a square meter in size and 10cm thick. It really made me wonder why it was so large, as I knew what is included and knew that the contents couldn't ever possibly take up this much space. My curiosity was satisfied when I opened the box. The contents are all very well packaged and protected by very thick foam. The protective foam is about 5cm thick on top and at least 2cm thick towards the sides and between the components. All the components are protected by a single piece of foam and cut to exactly fit, so they can not move or bounce around at all during transportation. This is a packaging prepared for every conceivable situation. Whoever designed it must have had a lot of bad experiences with shipping companies in the past.

The Aqua Premium kit from Aqua Computer may be nothing very special or innovative, nothing far unlike many other kits available more or less. Nevertheless, it is a very ideal kit for use by beginners and overclockers that require a low noise solution. While I would not recommend it to the most hardcore of overclockers, who will want far more complex and powerful systems, all but these individuals can use it and be very satisfied. Performance is not stellar, but it is ideal for a water cooling kit designed for silence and ease of use in mind. Quality is excellent along with reliability. Ease of use is hard to improve any further from my point of view.

Summing up the above, I believe that the kit is well worth a 9 out of a 10 point score. It is a most excellent kit for a beginner to use and performs well enough to satisfy many a seasoned overclocker without the need of listening to a very noisy fan. Simply ideal for the market it is aimed at.

Full Review.

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