Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Suse 10.1 RC 1 Report

Filed under

The beta cycle is history! I'm still sweeping up confetti here. OpenSUSE announced the availability of 10.1 release candidate 1 early this morning. I've actually been downloading the deltas lately and even though they come in fairly slow, it is much nicer downloading 300 mbs rather than 3 gigs. I highly recommend that method. I am in the process of downloading the full x86_64 version as well. It's coming in at a snails pace too, but hopefully I will be able to report on it before rc2 comes out. But back to the topic at hand. How did the release candidate do? Will this phase go as planned or will final have to be delayed? Here is my report.

Release Candidate phase implies feature and usually version freezes. As you can see from the small chart below, most applications received a teny number version upgrade, indicating an in-house bug fix or such. Those numbers actually indicate the number of builds, usually. So, if only one number difference, then only one build since the last build. With only 300mb difference in the iso package, we didn't really expect too many big changes.

10.1 beta9     10.1 rc1
Xorg 6.9.0-31 6.9.0-35
kdebase 3.5.1-49 3.5.1-54
gnome 2.12.2-17 2.12.2-18
gcc 4.1.0-10 4.1.0-16
OOo 2.0.2-12 2.0.2-15
kernel 2.6.16-8 2.6.16-20
gimp 2.2.10-16 2.2.10-17
gaim 1.5.0-44 1.5.0-45

In the changelog we find lots and lots of bug fixes and just a few new features. Some highlights include:

  • MozillaFirefox
    • added (optional) plastikfox theme
    • get some more security related patches
    • finally fixed the default proxy configuration by adding a new
      UI option
  • gnome-volume-manager
    • Add gnome-volume-properties back to the Control Center
  • wine
    • upstream 0.9.11
    • Fake dll files created in the system directory to help installers
    • Desktop mode now properly supports multiple processes
    • Several OpenGL fixes
    • Improved ESD audio driver
    • Direct3D 8 and 9 now use the same code
    • More Web browser support
    • Lots of bug fixes
  • banshee
    • Don't show error dialog if there were no errors burning the CD
    • Improved initial import dialog and mimetype detection for importing
    • Check to see if files exist before burning
    • Ensure any files Banshee has open on an iPod are closed before ejecting through HAL
    • Do not try to play audio through Helix that it cannot support
    • Only show the actual track that is playing in the view
  • gdm
    • Update .ICEauthority fixup patch, corrects serious security bug
  • kaffeine
    • Improve gstreamer 0.10 by getting visualization to work
  • kpowersave
    • rereleased official stable version 0.6
      • fixed detailed dialog for machines without CPUFreq support and more than one CPU/Core and/or throttling
      • added fix to be able to fake CPU info
      • fixed compiler warnings
  • kdebase3
    • Fix misplaced %endif
    • update medium->full hinting on a 10.1 update
    • fix possible Konsole crash on session saving/logout
    • fix panel configuration to not always ask to save
    • update media_hal.diff to make it possible that applications like k3b can stop automounting
    • fix wallpaper upgrade bug
  • beagle
    • Add a patch to add indicies to the sqlite database
    • Use cron.daily for running beagle-crawl-system
  • compiz
    • Changed default key-binding for scale plugin to F11
    • Fix darkenBack option in scale plugin
    • Don't start scale effect when some other plugin is running
    • Add flip_move option for only using edge flipping when moving windows
    • Support for screen edge flipping and hot corners
  • kdenetwork3
    • Fix serious bug where Idle status was set instead of Busy
  • xorg-x11
    • Do not use killall within the xdm scripts to avoid to kill xvkbd
      of other running sessions maybe local or remote
    • Avoid error message of not existent device tty0
  • Lots and lots of many many yast fixes
  • Full Changelog Since Beta 9

Some of the outstanding bugs they are still currently working on are:

  • Large scale testing showed a couple of issues especially with update of systems. I would advise everybody to be carefull in updating a system - and not update a production system (see below).
  • The bootloader shows "SUSE Linux 10.1 10.1"
  • Installation of packages from the installation source with rug/zen-installer fails in the installed system. We have put fixed packages (zen-updater, rug, libzypp-zmd-backend) for this on the ftp server, download them from here .
  • Updating from a previous beta tries to delete far too many packages. You should see conflicts for this in the installation proposal.
  • Every update adds another selection to the system
  • Installationsources are not available in the system
  • The YaST2 Xen module is not able to setup a VM.

The install of Suse 10.1 release candidate 1 went really well for me. Most the install would be a rehash if described in full again. It was almost "textbook" except for one little niggle. The downloading of Release Notes worked this time and then the next question concerns Online Updates. We are asked if we'd prefer to configure it now (recommended) or later, with check boxes for sending hardware and "other information" back. I click to configure now and it took quite a while. The clock cursor never did stop turning and switching to a console I could top and see that things were still happening. But this step took a really long time. Then after it reported there was a patch available and installed it (without error), it took another long time to finish whatever it was doing under the gui. But it did finish. That's the main thing.

After install, I didn't see any new eye candy or identify any new applications. The menus were still chocked full o' apps for almost every imaginable task and all but two opened and worked without issue. The two that did give me trouble were Kdetv and Zapping. Zapping froze up and crashed out and kdetv just wouldn't work properly. Maybe it's just me. I never have any luck with those apps anyway. But good ole xawtv performed as always - just almost perfectly.


There are all kinds of music programs ranging from merely playing to capture and edit. There wasn't enough screen space here to show all of them. In that same spirit are all the other categories. There are just too many office and internet apps, games, and development tools to list or screenshoot.



Gnome was working rather well this evening. Seems KDE will stay version 3.5.1 and gnome will stay 2.12 for 10.1. XGL Desktop was removed from the Gnome Control Center this time, as I speculate it won't be perfected in time for final release. I did test the display configuration in the GCC to set up xinerama, both cloned and expanded. That worked wonderfully.


The developers have been working so hard this release to rewrite the software package management suite. They've had a hard time of it. But I believe their efforts are beginning to pay off. The installation source manager worked wonderfully. I tested the package manager this time and had no problems. It installed and uninstalled without issue. The online update did as one might expect as well. It connected to some preset mirror(s) and downloaded the patch information. I selected a patch to install and it preceded to download and install it. I did experience trouble with the system update still as it reported an error stating that my os version number didn't match my install sources and then the summary screen reported conflicts it could not resolve (even though I had chosen no packages to install). But they are definitely getting there.


So, there ya have it. This is a definite release candidate. It's been a long beta cycle, but things are really shaping up quite nicely at this point. Everything was stable and almost everything was working fairly well. I think the look and feel are pretty much in place and we can expect to see very little change from here on out. Release candidate 2 is planned for next week and hopefully they will announce the final on or about the 25th.

More Screenshots Here.

Howto Apply Delta Isos:

This is really so easy that I hesitate to even mention it, but just in case someone needs to know, here's a handy copy and paste for this release:

  1. Have your last version isos available.
  2. Download the difference iso (delta iso).
  3. Open a terminal
  4. Apply the applydeltaiso command.
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD1.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD1.iso
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD2.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD2.iso
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD3.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD3.iso
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD4.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD4.iso
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD5.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD5.iso

More in Tux Machines

DevOps Handbook and Course

Leftovers: Gaming

Android Leftovers

  • Off We Go: Oracle Officially Appeals Google's Fair Use Win
    It was only a matter of time until this happened, but Oracle has officially appealed its fair use Java API loss to the Federal Circuit (CAFC). As you recall, after a years-long process, including the (correct) ruling that APIs are not covered by copyright being ridiculously overturned by CAFC, a new trial found that even if APIs are copyright-eligible, Google's use was covered by fair use. Oracle then tried multiple times to get Judge William Alsup to throw out the jury's ruling, but failed. In fact, on Oracle's second attempt to get Alsup to throw out the jury's ruling, citing "game changing" evidence that Google failed to hand over important information on discovery, it actually turned out that Oracle's lawyers had simply failed to read what Google had, in fact, handed over.
  • On iMessage’s Stickiness
  • Physical RAM attack can root Android and possibly other devices [Ed: Memory flipping is not at all an Android problem]

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Enterprise Open Source Programs Flourish -- In Tech and Elsewhere
    If you cycled the clock back about 15 years and surveyed the prevailing beliefs about open source technology at the time, you would find nowhere near the volume of welcome for it that we see today. As a classic example, The Register reported all the way back in 2001 that former CEO of Microsoft Steve Ballmer made the following famous statement in a Chicago Sun-Times interview: "Linux is a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches."
  • 5 More Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    In part one of this series, I covered my top five reasons to love Kubernetes, the open source container orchestration platform created by Google. Kubernetes was donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation in July of 2015, where it is now under development by dozens of companies including Canonical, CoreOS, Red Hat, and more. My first five reasons were primarily about the project’s heritage, ease of use, and ramp-up. The next five get more technical. As I mentioned in part one, choosing a distributed system to perform tasks in a datacenter is much more complex than looking at a spreadsheet of features or performance. And, you should make your decision based on your own needs and team dynamics. However, this top 10 list will give you my perspective, as someone who has been using, testing, and developing systems for a while now.
  • Bankers plan to give Corda blockchain code to Hyperledger project
  • Are European Banks Falling Behind in Blockchain Development?
  • Hyperledger adds 10 new members to support open source distributed ledger framework
    The Linux Foundation's Hyperledger project has announced that 10 new members have joined the project in order to help create an open standard for distributed ledgers for a new generation of transactional applications.
  • The Blockchain Created By Ethereum's Fork is Forking Now
    A blockchain that was born out of the rejection of a contentious technical change is on the cusp of making a decision some argue contradicts its core values. That's the situation the developers behind ethereum classic face ahead of a hard fork expected to be enacted on its blockchain on 25th October (should network participants approve the upgrade). Originally formed in reaction to a decision by the ethereum community to edit its "immutable" ledger, the fork caused an ideological schism among its enthusiasts. Alarmed by the action (or seeing a chance to profit by continuing the original network), miners and speculators began running its blockchain, which developers named "ethereum classic". Other investors then bought into the vision, and today, there are currently 85m classic ethers (ETC) worth $87m.
  • Red Hat: OpenStack moving beyond the proof-of-concept phase
    Red Hat’s annual poll found that 43 percent of respondents have deployed the cloud platform in production, compared to just 16 percent one year ago. The company reckons the increase reflects efforts by the community to address complexity and deployment issues that were previously known to have been a major roadblock to adoption. The study also noted that the steep learning curve for deploying OpenStack is being addressed as a growing number of engineers become certified to operate the platform. In addition, Red Hat cited cloud native application development as another driving force in enterprise adoption of OpenStack.
  • OpenStack Summit Emphasizes Security, Interoperability
    From security to interoperabilty to use cases and everything in-between, this week's OpenStack Summit from Oct. 25 to 28 in Barcelona, is set to illuminate the cloud. This year's event, which brings together vendors, operators and developers of the open-source cloud platform, will offer more sessions than ever before on securing OpenStack clouds. The Barcelona Summit follows the release of the OpenStack Newton milestone, which debuted on Oct. 6. While discussions about the most recent release are always part of every OpenStack Summit, so too are case-studies from operators of OpenStack clouds.
  • A complete view into application security must include open source [Ed: Black Duck spam (self-promotional marketing) takes form of FOSS FUD, as usual]
  • While Other Cities Go Linux, Toronto Bets Big on Microsoft Software [Ed: Toronto joins the Dark Forces]
    "" The partnership between Microsoft and the city of Toronto certainly comes at the right time, as other authorities across the world already announced decisions to give up on Windows and Office and replace them with open-source alternatives. Munich is the city that started the entire trend, but it wasn’t at all a smooth transition. Some of the local officials proposed a return to Microsoft software, claiming that training and assistance actually impacted productivity and explaining that in the end it all pays off to use Microsoft software because of the familiarity that users experience, which translates to a substantial productivity boost. And yet, the transition off Microsoft products is happening and more authorities are willing to do it, not necessarily because of the costs, but also due to security concerns, as is the case of Russia.
  • Open-Source Toolkit Lets Communities Build Their Own Street Furniture
    Despite the vast amount of customization options technology has allotted us, it can still be difficult to create projects that are community-centric. For example, though 3D printing can help us personalize our own jewelry, it has limited use for outfitting parks with trash cans or equipping bus stops with comfortable seating. Still, hyper-customizable tech has taught us the convenience of managing our own products, eliminating the bureaucratic complications of mass produced, production-line assembly. Leveraging this ideology to better the community, the Better Block Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to building local communities, has developed an open-source toolkit for creating a variety of fixtures for communities. The platform, called Wikiblock, allows designs ranging from benches to beer garden fences to be downloaded and taken to a maker space where a computer-aided machine can print the design from plywood. Similar to Ikea’s simplistic, DIY approach, the printed wood can be assembled by hand, without glue or nails.
  • How to make a lighted, porch bag for Halloween
    While I typically go all out for Halloween decorations every year, I'll admit I'm feeling tired this year. I still wanted to delight the neighborhood kids with simple details, so I decided to make lighted bags for my front porch railing this year. If you are someone who has a paper cutting machine like the Silhouette, this project will likely be a lot easier. Simply import the SVG file, resize for whatever size box you want, cut out, and assemble. However, for those of you who don't have one, I've included instructions on how to make this project without any machine at all. The box was created with the help of artists who share their art at OpenClipArt. I also used Inkscape to create the SVG file. If you don't like bats, you could modify the SVG file to include other types of clipart in the center of the bag.