Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

French bill casts chill on open-source DRM & P2P

Filed under
OSS

On May 4, the French Senate will debate a copyright bill that is widely expected to have a chilling effect on the development and distribution of open-source software for digital rights management (DRM) or P2P (peer-to-peer) file-sharing. That's because the bill's provisions include a penalty of up to three years in prison and a fine of $363,171 for publishing, distributing or promoting software in France that is "manifestly intended" for the unauthorized distribution of copyright works.

The developers of the open-source multimedia player VLC, which can read DRM-protected DVDs, consider themselves targeted. But the legal uncertainty over the term manifestly intended makes the bill's coverage so broad that it could even cover the open-source Web server Apache, which hosts over 60% of Web sites, opponents of the bill say. Open-source projects are thought to be more vulnerable than commercial operations because they typically have few resources at their disposal to defend legal actions.

France has been a strong supporter of open-source software, with many publicly funded bodies either using it or developing it. Legislation that punishes development and distribution of open-source applications could weaken projects based there, and tarnish the image of the open-source movement with users.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Security: MuddyWater, DJI, Updates, Reproducible Builds and Excel

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

7 tools for analyzing performance in Linux with bcc/BPF

A new technology has arrived in Linux that can provide sysadmins and developers with a large number of new tools and dashboards for performance analysis and troubleshooting. It's called the enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF, or just BPF), although these enhancements weren't developed in Berkeley, they operate on much more than just packets, and they do much more than just filtering. I'll discuss one way to use BPF on the Fedora and Red Hat family of Linux distributions, demonstrating on Fedora 26. BPF can run user-defined sandboxed programs in the kernel to add new custom capabilities instantly. It's like adding superpowers to Linux, on demand. Examples of what you can use it for include: Read more