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Our beloved PCLinuxOS has another rival in the wild. Klax based on Slackware 10.1 and features KDE 3.4 beta2 is being discusssed on KDE's news.dot

Good

The more the merrier I always say. The following is always encouraging to me:

Dave T. wrote:
I've always wanted to diddle with Linux, but didn't want to buy another machine just to play. I downloaded the ISO from PCLinuxOS and created a bootable CD. Whoda thunk it! I have a Dell 8200 with a DVD, CD-RW, ATI All-in-Wonder video card, 1gb memory and a Creative 5.1 sound card. The distro fired up and recognized everything and runs just fine, albeit a little slowly because it's running from the CD. I may have to rethink my reluctance for moving to Linux.

Re: Good

I know what he means in the sense that I have several friends at work who are interested in trying Linux, because I say I don't worry about viruses, trojans and spyware, but are very reluctant. The livecd format is the best thing that's come along for Linux since the graphical installers. I have one friend who runs his computer almost solely off a livecd. He says he'll get brave and try to install to harddrive one of these days. But I don't think PCLOS will ever meet it's match in beauty or included features. Other's may put out great livecds, but 'Tex's is the bestest'! Big Grin

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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