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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Tbricks supports Linux
  • With B1 Archiver, No Need to RTFM

    Archiving tools typically are intimidating and confusing. Even those with GUIs often require an investment of time to figure out how to use them. B1 is very intuitive. Almost every action can be executed through keyboard shortcuts. The menu row at the top of the app window has only three drop-down categories: File, Commands and Help. The dialog boxes that open from the menu are well designed and easy to use.

  • Stream and Share Your Media with PlexWeb

    I freely admit that I wish Plex was open source. Thankfully, however, its proprietary code does't mean Linux users are excluded.

  • 5 Of The Best Programming Editors Under Linux [2014]

    When NodeJS made its debut in open source market, around 4 years ago, everyone knew what was going to follow. Programmers loved it at first sight, used it and evolved it. The idea of having a JS client, that talks to a JS server and stores data in a JS database ( document databases ), was quite attractive and people adapt it at once, in every case, right or wrong.

  • Make Peace with pax

    pax is one of the lesser known utilities in a typical Linux installation. That's too bad, because pax has a very good feature set, and its command-line options are easy to understand and remember. pax is an archiver, like tar(1), but it's also a better version of cp(1) in some ways, not least because you can use pax with SSH to copy sets of files over a network. Once you learn pax, you may wonder how you lived without it all these years.

  • Essential LaTeX Tools

    LaTeX is a document preparation system and document markup language for high-quality typesetting. The system was originally developed by Leslie Lamport in the early 1980s. LaTeX is based on Donald E. Knuth's TeX typesetting language. Lamport says that LaTeX “represents a balance between functionality and ease of use”.

  • mpck: Seemingly misnamed
  • Azul Systems extends Zulu to support Java 6 and major Linux distributions
  • The Future of OpenShift and Docker Containers

    A few months ago, Docker (then dotCloud) and Red Hat announced a partnership to collaborate around Docker, the excellent container management solution for Linux. At the time, the OpenShift team was heads down working on our 2.0 release, but we were already thinking about how we could use Docker to take application development and deployment on OpenShift to the next level.

More in Tux Machines

Rugged mini-PC runs Android on Via’s Cortex-A9 SoC

Via debuted a rugged fanless low-power Android mini-PC based on Via’s dual-core Cortex-A9 Elite E1000 SoC, and offering mini-PCIe, mSATA, HDMI, and GbE I/O. Via designed the “Artigo A900″ mini-PC for use in Android-based interactive kiosks, home automation devices, signage, and other HMI solutions. The 125 x 125 x 30mm mini-PC can be configured to “blend locally-captured real-time video streams with cloud-delivered content to create visually-compelling interactive displays for retail, banking, museums, and other environments,” says Via Technologies. The device can integrate peripherals including sensors, cameras, ticket printers, and barcode and fingerprint scanners, adds the company. Read more

Newest Androids will join iPhones in offering default encryption, blocking police

The next generation of Google’s Android operating system, due for release next month, will encrypt data by default for the first time, the company said Thursday, raising yet another barrier to police gaining access to the troves of personal data typically kept on smartphones. Android has offered optional encryption on some devices since 2011, but security experts say few users have known how to turn on the feature. Now Google is designing the activation procedures for new Android devices so that encryption happens automatically; only somebody who enters a device's password will be able to see the pictures, videos and communications stored on those smartphones. Read more

X.Org Server Shatter Project Fails

Earlier this summer was the start of an X.Org-funded project to develop Shatter. Shatter has long been talked about as a new feature for the X.Org Server to replace Xinerama. Shatter comes down to allowing the X.Org Server to split the rendering between multiple GPUs with each GPU covering different areas of a larger desktop. A student from Cameroon hoped to develop the Shatter support after such feature was talked about for years. The student, Nyah Check, was being funded by the X.Org Foundation through the foundation's Endless Vacation of Code project that's similar in nature to Google's GSoC but runs year-round and is much more loose about requirements. Read more

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