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Find the best desktop Linux distributions for new users

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Linux

Users are confused when they first come to Linux about which distribution they should be using and I have heard people say “I was thinking of Ubuntu or Arch” or “I was thinking about Gentoo and how hard is it to use Linux From Scratch”.

This article lists the top 10 distributions according to Distrowatch for 2013 and gives a brief outline of the purpose of those distributions and whether they are the sort of operating systems a new user or average computer user should be using as their first port of call.

Linux Mint
Ubuntu
Debian
Mageia
Fedora
openSUSE
PCLinuxOS
Manjaro
Arch
Puppy

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http://www.itworld.com/open-source/404430/find-best-desktop-linux-distributions-for-new-users

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