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No Licence Needed for Kubuntu Derivative Distributions

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KDE
Legal

Later last year rumours of this nonsense started appearing in the tech press so instead of writing a grumpy blog post I e-mailed the community council and said they needed to nip it in the bud and state that no licence is needed to make a derivative distribution. Time passed, at some point Canonical changed their licence policy to be called an Intellectual property rights policy and be much more vague about any licences needed for binary packages. Now the community council have put out a Statement on Canonical Package Licensing which is also extremely vague and generally apologetic for Canonical doing this.

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VAR-SOM-MX7 is now available with Certified 802.11ac/a/b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.2 support

Variscite has announced the upgrade of its popular VAR-SOM-MX7 module to the BT/BLE 4.2 version. The upgrade, applied to all the different variants of the product, features higher speed and improved security. This innovative technology has a significant and direct impact on IoT devices, in particular on those with critical requirements for privacy. In addition, the company has announced the expansion of the VAR-SOM-MX7 product line, launching a new variant with the latest generation of Wi-Fi standards. This upgrade comes shortly after the implementation of similar features on another popular company module, the DART-6UL. The newly introduced VAR-SOM-MX7-5G variant is enhanced with fully certified Wi-Fi/BT module and carries 802.11ac/a/b/g/n dual band 2.4/5 GHz support. This variant provides improved performance and effective bit-rate. An ideal solution for devices requiring high data transfer rates over the wireless network or simultaneous connections. The company will continue to provide the successful Initial VAR-SOM-MX7 variant in parallel with the new VAR-SOM-MX7-5G variant power by NXP i.MX7 1GHz dual-core Cortex-A7 processor. All the while keeping a very attractive price range - starting from 35 USD. The VAR-SOM-MX7-5G and the VAR-SOM-MX7 are pin-to-pin compatible, sharing the exact same interfaces and features-set. They support industrial temperature grade and include real-time 200MHz ARM Cortex-M4 co-processor, with longevity commitment until 2025. Variscite provides fully production-ready software suits for the VAR-SOM-MX7 and VAR-SOM-MX7-5G, based on the leading platforms in the market including Linux Yocto, Debian, and FreeRTOS. The aim: To deliver an end-to-end solution that will shorten and facilitate development time and efforts. Availability and pricing: The VAR-SOM-MX7 System on Module and associate development kits are available now for orders in production quantities, starting from 35 USD per unit. VAR-SOM-MX7-5G key features include: • Certified Wi-Fi 802.11ac/b/g/n & Bluetooth 4.2/BLE • Cortex-A7 NXP iMX7 dual 1000MHz • Real-time Cortex-M4 200MHz co-processor • Up to 32 GB eMMC / 512 MB NAND and 2048 MB DDR3L • Touchscreen controller • Dual gigabit Ethernet with integrated PHY • Display: 24-bit parallel RGB up to WXGA, MIPI DSI, EPD • Dual USB 2.0 (OTG/ Host), PCIe • Camera input: Parallel, CSI • Digital/analog audio in/out • 32-bit parallel external local bus • Dual CAN, SPI, PWM, ADC, UART, I2C, SD/MMC About Variscite: Variscite is a leading System on Modules (SoM) and Single-Board-Computer (SBC) design and manufacture company. A trusted provider of development and production services for a variety of embedded platforms, Variscite transforms clients' visions into successful products. Visit Variscite's website: http://www.variscite.com Email sales@variscite.com or call +972 9 9562910 for more information

Applications: Snapcraft, Cutegram, LaTeX Editors, Spreadsheet Editors (Like Calc), Vivaldi

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

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  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty
    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice. In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks. Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS. By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.” More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?
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Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine. "The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required." Read more