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Distros to add

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THE DISTROS section here could use expansion in case the forums become active again. Any suggestions for addition?

VERY COOL!

Thank you, Susan! Smile

~Eric

Distribution Suggestions

No Linux/Open Source message board would be complete without sub-categories for Slackware and Debian. Just a suggestion... Wink

Done

I have just added those two to http://www.tuxmachines.org/forum

I hope more people start participating. I know I would.

More in Tux Machines

Programming: PHP, Scheme, Perl, Python and JavaScript

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