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tuxmachines vs lxer

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With all due respect, I like what you are doing/trying-to-do Smile
However, this site now has become almost indistinguishable from lxer.com.
With Susan at the helm, there was sufficient differences that I kept checking out both - now I don't really see the point any more ... the (almost) only difference is now the layout.

Please don't regard this post too badly - I'm not trying to 'push your head under water', and as I initially said - yes, I like what you are trying to do.

Maybe a slight change of focus? You are both addressing the same audience.

Layout or material

Is it the layout that became similar or just the type of stories? One sure thing is, we cover Linux beyond just the desktop.

What needs to be altered?

material/stories

As I said initially, about the only difference is the layout - the articles being linked to are virtually the same.
As for being 'positive' *chuckles* - I know, its far easier to criticize than to have positive suggestions as to what should be changed.
I guess my experience is more a gut feeling - I open one of you first, skim through the 'headlines', follow the links if there is something I find interesting.
Then when I go to the other site, it's like: "Hey - I have just seen all of this before"

The one change I would 'dare' to suggest would be to go a bit deeper into the different distros. I know - the 'testers' are 10-a-penny, but to me they are but scratching the surface. In addition, they all start with a clean slate - ie they use the entire disk for whichever distro they are testing at the moment. Most of us can't do that - we will have to make it live beside whatever else we have on our disks. Virtual machines - sure, you can do that, but it won't tell you how well your peripherals are supported ...
The all-encompassing [sarcasm]features[/sarcasm] of grub2 can be a real 'pita' when you have several distros side-by-side. What about uefi? Loads of horror-stories about being unable to properly install even when secure boot is disabled.

Personally, I have found a way out of it - I use a small partition for legacy grub (and legacy grub on the MBR) and chainload to whichever distro I want to boot. Whenever a I do an install, I let it install its bootloader in the first sector of the root filesystem. However - that means you are restricted in the filesystems you can use - basically - it boils down to ext3/ext4 and nothing else. It also means that uefi is out-of-the-question.

In short - these are the things _I_ would like to read about, but then - _my_ wants and interests may not coincide with anyone else's ...
Infact - my only purpose with starting this thread was to give you the heads-up that both you and lxer are becoming ever so similar.

Thanks for 'listening' ...

More distro reviews

The key point that stays with me is that we need to try harder to cover distro reviews, even from lesser-organised and less 'formal' sites. I will make some adjustments.

In a way you are right because Susan used to focus a lot on reviews. I come more from the angle of advocacy.

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