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HTC announces Desire 816 and 610 at MWC14

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

The phablet carries a massive 5.5 inch screen, but no fancy 1080p stuff, but rather sports a respectful 720×1280 pixel resolution display. It is powered by a quad core Snapdragon processor clocked at 1.6GHz. There is 1.5GB of RAM and 8GB internal memory which is expandable upto 128GB. There’s no ultra pixel camera but HTC has managed to put in a 13 megapixel snapper, along with a decent 5 MP front camera for better selfies. The battery is non-removable and has a capacity of 2600 mAh.

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