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Curmudgeon deems SUSE 10.1 "really cool and solid"

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SUSE

This is one really, really cool and solid distribution. OK, before I go any further I should point out that SUSE 10.1 (code name: Agama Lizard) isn't actually released yet. I've been kicking the tires of the first SUSE 10.1 "Release Candidate."

Novell and its SUSE buddies comes right out and say, "This is an unsupported, open source only, preliminary edition of SUSE Linux that contains bleeding-edge packages and represents the latest development snapshot." In short, do not, we repeat do not, run this on a production system.

Fool that I am, after I spent a day working with SUSE 10.1 on one of my test systems, I started swapping it in on my production SUSE 10 Linux desktop.

Why? Because I really like it, and I, as something of a Linux expert, can steer around problems that may knock most users over. Now if you want to follow in my footsteps, be certain to read the Most Annoying Bugs list. The only one I found troublesome was that the Xen module in YaST2 -- SUSE's management system -- won't let you setup a Xen VM (virtual machine) properly.

Even so, if you know Xen and you're not afraid to get your hands dirty, it's not a deal-breaker.

Let me also just say that while I've had smooth sailing, other expert SUSE users have been having fits with YaST2, the bootloader, and updating the system with new or updated packages. So, I suggest that most users might be better off waiting for the final code.

After all, SUSE 10.1 is due to go final at the end of April, and from what I see, the developers will either hit the date on the nose or be no more than a week or so off.

So, why would you take your computer's life in your hands and give it a try?

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