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The PCLinuxOS 0.93 MiniME

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Texstar has announced that a new version of PCLinuxOS is available for downloading and testing. But don't expect the same distro you might be used to. No, this version is a scaled down version of 287 mb called interestingly enough: The PCLinuxOS 0.93 MiniME. It consists of a 2.6.15-oci3 kernel, Basic KDE 3.5.2 desktop (kdebase and kdelibs only) , PCLOS Control Center, and the Synaptic Software Installer.

Distrowatch has quoted Texstar's announcement to the PCLOS mailing list which can also be read here. Texstar states the main target of his mini version is, "Anyone who wants to install whatever they want."

        

That's what you get. You get a base system with a skeletal kdebase. This makes for a shorter initial download, shorter install time, but most importantly, a fully customized version of your favorite OS as lean or full-featured as you desire.

        

As per usual, one just uses the handy and user-friendly installer to install the system to their harddrive.

        

And at that point you can install all of the software you wish from the Synaptic Package Manager.

        

Please bear in mind that this is a testing release, so bugs may be present. I tested it this morning, and as usual, I had no problems with stability or performance of PCLOS. For those of you wondering, this is not the PCLOS .93 release. This is another option. Word has it a full regular PCLinuxOS .93 is expected in the coming weeks. Also, look for an all new PCLOS .94 later in the summer or early fall that will be completely rebuilt from the ground up featuring a new compiler and developmental tools.

There is a board on the PCLOS forum for discussion of any issues that may arise and can be found HERE. Consult the announcements for a download mirror near you. More screenshots are available HERE.

Re: Second guessing KDE package compiler?

atang1 wrote:

Since shared modules are in the kernels and library, and KDE already has fully compatible library with their 124 mb installation. The debian dkpg only needed the script that is used to compile the program. If there are differences between kpackage and dkpg, a filter might convert the source code easily?

Well, I don't know about all that. Texstar's packages are binary builds for his system - download and install.

For my main desktop, I just download KDE's source, either tarballs at release or svn in-between releases, and do it the old-fashioned: ./configure, make, make install.

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