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Running Tux Machines

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Roy Schestowitz

TUX Machines has become an integral part of our life right here in this humble home. It's a rewarding experience but also a demanding experience. I personally write my articles in the lounge (which is no 'press room') and it requires many hours of digging and researching news. In Tux Machines, unlike in Techrights for example, it's mostly about finding news of high relevance and importance, and finding them fast! Timing counts. We don't want readers to waste their time wading/going through irrelevant, unimportant and out-of-date reports.

24/7 coverage of news is easy for us. Rianne works mostly at daytime, whereas I usually work at nights (customers are mostly government/public sector and they require 24/7 coverage). When Rianne is working I take over the responsibilities at Tux Machines and vice versa. We swap responsibilities like this when it comes to housework as well; we work out together when we are out of the house (also separately in terms of gym sections, e.g. cardiovascular/weights). This week we go to yoga classes as much as 5 times, but we usually just to Town for other facilities like pool, table tennis, sauna (men and women separately), gym, etc. This is our main escape from Tux Machines; given Wi-Fi (scarce coverage but definitely existent in Manchester City Centre), we sometimes update Tux Machines while out of the house as well.

The site forums are now open for participation and every registered member can add blog posts and push them to the front page (now that we've got the spam epidemic under control). Please do consider participating. This week, as in previous weeks, we are seeing a ~10% growth in traffic (week-to-week), perhaps owing to the slight redesign, loading speeds (Varnish cache), and very frequent updates. We check for news once in a few hours in order to keep abreast of breaking events.

Running Tux Machines will hopefully become more of a community effort over time. Anyone who is logged in can now submit stories. Unless this gets abused by spammers, we will keep it that way.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

The Share/Save button

I wish you would considering moving that Share/Save button from under the Read More Links. Dang thing keeps popping up when I move my cursor over to Read More.

The button

Someone else reported a similar issue, whereupon we made the button much smaller. Let's see if we can move it into just pertinent nodes.

Done

The buttons were removed from the front page.

Dr. Roy Running Tux Machines Now?

Where the h3ll have I been lately that I missed this important transformation at one of my favorite sites?

I hope all is well with Susan L. I've been a fan of Tux Machines a lot longer than I've been registered here. I finally got around to registering a few years ago so I could reply to comments others had made to my Nocturnal Slacker v1.0 articles that Susan had linked to here.

Having followed your own site (Techrights), Dr. Roy, for quite some time, I'm confident that you'll do us all proud here at Tux Machines.

Very COOL! Smile

Regards,

V. T. Eric Layton (AKA Nocturnal Slacker, vtel57... and other names Wink )
Tampa, Florida, USA
http://vtel57.com

Thanks

Thanks for the kind words. I had linked to Nocturnal Slacker dozens of times in the past. I usually picked up the links from Susan.

Indeed, and Thanks!

I always received tons of traffic whenever you or Susan linked to one of my posts. One of these days, I will kick start my article writing back into motion on Nocturnal Slacker v1.0.

Stay tuned... Smile

Excellent

We'll keep an eye open for it.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: Application Migration, Departure, OpenShift Commons Gathering and More

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    More and more frequently, modern applications are choosing a container-first development and deployment paradigm built on the foundation of Kubernetes. However, not all applications are fully modernized and containerized micro services. Many applications are a hybrid of architectures and technology which have existed for years, even decades. This can add complexity, both to the application architecture and management overhead, when a container-based, cloud-native application component needs to access existing functionality which is virtual machine based. Container-native virtualization provides flexibility during the modernization process so that you can focus on the most critical aspects first, while still being able to access, manage, and consume VM-based aspects using the new Kubernetes-centric tools. Based on the KubeVirt project, recently accepted by the CNCF, Container-native virtualization manages both virtual machines and containers through a single control plane saving time, resources, and budget. Red Hat Container-native virtualization delivers KubeVirt functionality directly to OpenShift customers and helps to manage both virtual machines and OpenShift deployments from a single platform. This single platform simplifies the management of virtual machines and containers with a common Kubernetes interface that standardizes orchestration, networking, and storage management while also supporting the long term move to containers.

  • Alberto Ruiz: Hanging the Red Hat

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  • Recap: OpenShift Commons Gathering at Kubecon/NA San Diego [Videos Uploaded]

    The OpenShift Commons Gathering in San Diego brought together over 550+ Kubernetes and Cloud Native experts from all over the world to discuss container technologies, best practices for cloud native application developers and the open source software projects that underpin the OpenShift ecosystem.

  • IBM Kicks Up Kubernetes Compatibility With Open Source

Antoine Beaupré: a quick review of file watchers

File watchers. I always forget about those and never use then, but I constantly feel like I need them. So I made this list to stop searching everywhere for those things which are surprisingly hard to find in a search engine. Read more

Solaris/UNIX: New Solaris Update/Release, Mystery of Unix History

  • Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU15

    Today we are releasing SRU 15, the November 2019 SRU, for Oracle Solaris 11.4. It is available via 'pkg update' from the support repository or by downloading the SRU from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2433412.1.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU15 Has A Number Of Package Updates

    While there is no sign of Solaris 11.5 or Solaris.Next (last year was a road-map pointing to Solaris 11.Next in H2'19 or H1'20 that has since been removed), Oracle does continue putting out more updates to the Solaris 11.4 series. Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU 15 was released on Tuesday as the latest monthly update to the Solaris stable series. With Solaris 11.4 SRU 15 are more Python 3 modules being added along with other Python updates, updating the GCC compiler against v9.2, updates to other toolchain bits like CMake, and a wide range of security updates.

  • A Mystery of Unix History

    The two most popular historic editors on Unix, vi and emacs, both make heavy use of these features (Emacs using Esc when Alt or Meta is unavailable). Some of the later entries in the DEC terminal line, especially the vt510, supported key remapping or alternative keyboards, which can address the Esc issue, but not entirely. According to the EmacsOnTerminal page and other research, at least the vt100 through the vt420 lacked Esc by default. Ctrl-3 and Ctrl-[ could send the character. However, this is downright terrible for both vi and Emacs (as this is the only way to trigger meta commands in Emacs). What’s more, it seems almost none of these old serial terminal support hardware flow control, and flow control is an absolute necessity on many. That implies XON/XOFF, which use Ctrl-S and Ctrl-Q — both of which are commonly used in Emacs.

Mesa 19.2.5

Hi list,

I'd like to announce mesa 19.2.5. This is a return to our regularly scheduled
release cadence, featuring a reasonable number of fixes. In general things are
slowing down on the 19.2 branch, and things are starting to look pretty nice.

There's a little bit over everything in here, with anv and radeonsi standing out
as the two biggest components getting changes, but core mesa, core gallium,
llvmpipe, nir, egl, i965, tgsi, st/mesa, spirv, and the Intel compiler also
fixes in this release.

Dylan


Shortlog
========

Ben Crocker (1):
      llvmpipe: use ppc64le/ppc64 Large code model for JIT-compiled shaders

Brian Paul (1):
      Call shmget() with permission 0600 instead of 0777

Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (1):
      spirv: Don't leak GS initialization to other stages

Danylo Piliaiev (1):
      i965: Unify CC_STATE and BLEND_STATE atoms on Haswell as a workaround

Dylan Baker (4):
      docs: Add SHA256 sum for for 19.2.4
      cherry-ignore: Update for 19.2.4 cycle
      docs: Add relnotes for 19.2.5
      VERSION: bump for 19.2.5

Eric Engestrom (1):
      egl: fix _EGL_NATIVE_PLATFORM fallback

Ian Romanick (2):
      nir/algebraic: Add the ability to mark a replacement as exact
      nir/algebraic: Mark other comparison exact when removing a == a

Illia Iorin (1):
      mesa/main: Ignore filter state for MS texture completeness

Jason Ekstrand (1):
      anv: Stop bounds-checking pushed UBOs

Lepton Wu (1):
      gallium: dri2: Use index as plane number.

Lionel Landwerlin (3):
      anv: invalidate file descriptor of semaphore sync fd at vkQueueSubmit
      anv: remove list items on batch fini
      anv/wsi: signal the semaphore in the acquireNextImage

Marek Olšák (3):
      st/mesa: fix Sanctuary and Tropics by disabling ARB_gpu_shader5 for them
      tgsi_to_nir: fix masked out image loads
      tgsi_to_nir: handle PIPE_FORMAT_NONE in image opcodes

Paulo Zanoni (1):
      intel/compiler: fix nir_op_{i,u}*32 on ICL

Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (3):
      radeonsi: disable sdma for gfx10
      radeonsi: tell the shader disk cache what IR is used
      radeonsi: fix shader disk cache key


git tag: mesa-19.2.5

Read more Also: Mesa 19.2.5 Released With Intel Vulkan + RadeonSI Driver Fixes