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First beta of KDE Applications 4.13 is out

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KDE

It’s Christmas time for KDE Software users, the team has just announced the first beta of the 4.13 versions of Applications and Development Platform. This release also marks a freeze on APIs, dependencies and features so the team will now focus on hunting down bugs and polish it further.

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KDE

I will wait for Beta 2 but I am itching to try this and start spamming bug reports Smile
I think this is a nice preview of the positive direction that is KDE development is taking especially since in the future, KF5 doesn't plan on reinventing the wheel.

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