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GNU Guile 2.0.10 released

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GNU

Guile is an implementation of the Scheme programming language, with support for many SRFIs, packaged for use in a wide variety of environments. In addition to implementing the R5RS Scheme standard and a large subset of R6RS, Guile includes a module system, full access to POSIX system calls, networking support, multiple threads, dynamic linking, a foreign function call interface, and powerful string processing.

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GNOME Usability and Keysign

Android Leftovers

Report: DOD must embrace open-source software

The Defense Department increasingly relies on software for everything from weapons systems to accounting, but it is failing to capitalize on the power of open-source software, according to a report from the Center for a New American Security. In "Open Source Software and the Department of Defense," CNAS argues that a number of cultural factors, biases and regulatory barriers are keeping DOD from embracing open-source options. "Unfortunately, software development is not currently a high-profile, high-priority topic in the discussion about diminishing U.S. military technical superiority," the report states. "It should be." Industry relies heavily on open-source software with great success, and DOD's continued reliance on proprietary code is more expensive, slows innovation and puts America's warfighters at greater risk, according to CNAS. Read more