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Sticky Tahr-fy pudding: Ubuntu 14.04 is slickest Linux desktop ever

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Ubuntu

Code-named Trusty Tahr, 14.04 will be a Long Term Support release, meaning Canonical will support what you get in April for five years.

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More Ubuntu in the news:

  • Linux distro Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr Final Beta available now
  • Atlantic.Net Adds Latest Ubuntu LTS for All Linux Cloud VPS Hosting
  • Ubuntu 14.04 beta 2 released
  • Ubuntu 14.04 final beta download: A much-needed upgrade for LTS users

    The next version of the world’s preeminent Linux distro, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, is almost upon us. Late last night, the final beta of 14.04 Trusty Tahr (an African wild goat) was released, with the final build due on April 17. Trusty Tahr is the first long-term support (LTS) build of Ubuntu in two years, and is thus contains a lot of exciting features that thousands (millions?) of Ubuntu 12.04 users can’t wait to get their hands on.

  • Is Canonical as arrogant as Apple?

    Canonical has had a rocky relationship at times with the rest of the open source community. The company has sometimes gone in its own direction and rather blithely disregarded criticism from others in free software. Datamation takes a look at the root of Canonical's problem and thinks that it's more about relationships than it is about specific software issues.

  • Linux 3.14 Isn't Going To Make It Into Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

    There were hopes that the Linux 3.14 kernel would make it into Ubuntu 14.04 LTS given that it has much better Intel Broadwell graphics support, other new hardware enablement, and a ton of new features. Sadly, it looks like only the Linux 3.13 kernel will be shipped by default in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Fortunately, with the new hardware enablement strategy of Ubuntu Long Term Support releases, in 14.04.1 or 14.04.2 we will see a new kernel (along with Mesa/X components) back-ported from later release series.

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