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Linux Kernel Developers Fed Up With Ridiculous Bugs In Systemd

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Linux
Red Hat

When systemd sees "debug" as part of the kernel command-line, it will spit out so much informaiton about the system that it fails to boot... The init system just collapses the system with too much information being sent to the dmesg when seeing the debug option as part of the kernel command-line parameter. Within the systemd bug report it was suggested for systemd not to look for a simple "debug" string to go into its debug mode but perhaps something like "systemd.debug" or other namespaced alternatives. The debug kernel command-line parameter has been used by upstream Linux kernel developers for many years. However, upstream systemd developers don't agree about changing their debug code detection. Kay Sievers of Red Hat wrote, "Generic terms are generic, not the first user owns them."

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systemd bug locks xorg after resume

I used to think it was a bug in the catalyst driver, which was rock solid until opensuse switched to systemd- since then I consistently experienced locking after a suspend/resume. It is random and you can resume a dozen times before it finally locks up.

I thought it may be a bug in catalyst driver so I switched to the open source radeon driver, with the same behaviour- random lock-ups after resume.

Interestingly, even hibernate behaves like that - it can work a few times and then suddenly, one hibernate will boot to a blank screen.

Wonder WHEN they will fix the bug, if ever.

systemd

Generally systemd needs a stabilization period. It took ages for 209 to be released because they added so many features followed by quick 210,211,212 bugfix releases.
If you look at the git tree, the TODO is growing very quickly.
I understand systemd is still in very early development and they are far from the "vision" they are going after.
They more or less admitted this by creating a systemd-stable branch.
http://cgit.freedesktop.org/systemd/systemd-stable/

Pulseaudio

The same developer put a half-baked Pulseaudio in some distros (or backly-packaged Pulseaudio in Ubuntu, Mandriva etc.) and it caused many users -- myself included -- to get frustrated/angry/less productive around 2008-2010.

Pulseaudio

That's why I recompile kde/mplayer/ffmpeg, etc.. without pulseaudio support Smile

Pulseaudio

Pulseaudio has worked well for a number of years now.

Pulseaudio

I scrubbed pulseaudio off my system after getting sound errors in video screen recording. Errors stopped immediately--this was a couple of weeks ago.

Luckily it is optional in

Luckily it is optional in most places outside Gnome.

KDE

When I used Mandriva 2008.1 (Spring), which came with KDE, it was not really optional. The same goes for Kubuntu. I actually have many problems with KMix these days. I regularly need to kill/close it and start it again, but the problem may be caused by laptop volume controls (kmix bug).

KDE

optional at build time Smile

Gentoo or Arch

So I guess you use something like Gentoo or Arch.

Arch

Yes, Arch. There are some things I like such as the flexibility.
Others thinks such as "optional dependencies" I'm not so fond of Smile
So it has its pros and cons Smile
But I have been using it since 2006 on old computer on since 2009 on this one Smile

Arch

Arch has impressed me in recent years, but I stick to Debian.

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