Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Kernel Developers Fed Up With Ridiculous Bugs In Systemd

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

When systemd sees "debug" as part of the kernel command-line, it will spit out so much informaiton about the system that it fails to boot... The init system just collapses the system with too much information being sent to the dmesg when seeing the debug option as part of the kernel command-line parameter. Within the systemd bug report it was suggested for systemd not to look for a simple "debug" string to go into its debug mode but perhaps something like "systemd.debug" or other namespaced alternatives. The debug kernel command-line parameter has been used by upstream Linux kernel developers for many years. However, upstream systemd developers don't agree about changing their debug code detection. Kay Sievers of Red Hat wrote, "Generic terms are generic, not the first user owns them."

Read more ►

systemd bug locks xorg after resume

I used to think it was a bug in the catalyst driver, which was rock solid until opensuse switched to systemd- since then I consistently experienced locking after a suspend/resume. It is random and you can resume a dozen times before it finally locks up.

I thought it may be a bug in catalyst driver so I switched to the open source radeon driver, with the same behaviour- random lock-ups after resume.

Interestingly, even hibernate behaves like that - it can work a few times and then suddenly, one hibernate will boot to a blank screen.

Wonder WHEN they will fix the bug, if ever.

systemd

Generally systemd needs a stabilization period. It took ages for 209 to be released because they added so many features followed by quick 210,211,212 bugfix releases.
If you look at the git tree, the TODO is growing very quickly.
I understand systemd is still in very early development and they are far from the "vision" they are going after.
They more or less admitted this by creating a systemd-stable branch.
http://cgit.freedesktop.org/systemd/systemd-stable/

Pulseaudio

The same developer put a half-baked Pulseaudio in some distros (or backly-packaged Pulseaudio in Ubuntu, Mandriva etc.) and it caused many users -- myself included -- to get frustrated/angry/less productive around 2008-2010.

Pulseaudio

That's why I recompile kde/mplayer/ffmpeg, etc.. without pulseaudio support Smile

Pulseaudio

Pulseaudio has worked well for a number of years now.

Pulseaudio

I scrubbed pulseaudio off my system after getting sound errors in video screen recording. Errors stopped immediately--this was a couple of weeks ago.

Luckily it is optional in

Luckily it is optional in most places outside Gnome.

KDE

When I used Mandriva 2008.1 (Spring), which came with KDE, it was not really optional. The same goes for Kubuntu. I actually have many problems with KMix these days. I regularly need to kill/close it and start it again, but the problem may be caused by laptop volume controls (kmix bug).

KDE

optional at build time Smile

Gentoo or Arch

So I guess you use something like Gentoo or Arch.

Arch

Yes, Arch. There are some things I like such as the flexibility.
Others thinks such as "optional dependencies" I'm not so fond of Smile
So it has its pros and cons Smile
But I have been using it since 2006 on old computer on since 2009 on this one Smile

Arch

Arch has impressed me in recent years, but I stick to Debian.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Nintendo Switch hack + Dolphin Emulator could bring GameCube and Wii game support

This week security researchers released details about a vulnerability affecting NVIDIA Tegra X1 processors that makes it possible to bypass secure boot and run unverified code on some devices… including every Nintendo Switch game console that’s shipped to date. Among other things, this opens the door for running modified versions of Nintendo’s firmware, or alternate operating systems such as a GNU/Linux distribution. And if you can run Linux… you can also run Linux applications. Now it looks like one of those applications could be the Dolphin emulator, which lets you play Nintendo GameCube and Wii games on a computer or other supported devices. Read more

Openwashing Leftovers

Linux Foundation: New Members, Cloud Foundry, and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit

  • 41 Organizations Join The Linux Foundation to Support Open Source Communities With Infrastructure and Resources
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 28 Silver members and 13 Associate members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the shared technology resources, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation. Linux Foundation member contributions help provide the infrastructure and resources that enable the world's largest open collaboration communities.
  • Cloud Foundry for Developers: Architecture
    Back in the olden days, provisioning and managing IT stacks was complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. Getting the resources to do your job could take weeks or months. Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) was the first major step in automating IT stacks, and introduced the self-service provisioning and configuration model. VMware and Amazon were among the largest early developers and service providers. Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) adds the layer to IaaS that provides application development and management. Cloud Foundry is for building Platform as a Service (PaaS) projects, which bundle servers, networks, storage, operating systems, middleware, databases, and development tools into scalable, centrally-managed hardware and software stacks. That is a lot of work to do manually, so it takes a lot of software to automate it.
  • Jonathan Corbet on Linux Kernel Contributions, Community, and Core Needs
    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report. The annual Linux Kernel Development Report, released by The Linux Foundation is the evolution of work Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman had been doing independently for years. The goal of the report is to document various facets of kernel development, such as who is doing the work, what is the pace of the work, and which companies are supporting the work.

Best Linux server distro of 2018

As a free and open source operating system, Linux is the ideal candidate for setting up your own server. The community of developers behind each Linux distribution (distro) regularly review the source code of their chosen OS to make sure it's free of bugs. When it comes to servers, the emphasis should obviously be on stability. While upgrades are a good thing on the face of it, they have the potential to interfere with the smooth running of your server. We’ve highlighted some of our favourite Linux server distros in this article, including operating systems that offer long term support, stability, and ideally a fast setup process. Read more