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Open-Xchange Announces Comprehensive Feature Upgrade for Community Edition

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More than 100 Improvements Extend Usability, Security and Integration Capabilities for Leading Open Source Collaboration Suite

TARRYTOWN, NY, April 25, 2006 – Open-Xchange, Inc. today released a comprehensive feature update for the community edition of Open-Xchange Server -- adding more than 100 improvements in the usability and integration capabilities of the leading open source collaboration software and also released the core content under a Creative Commons Deed.

Open-Xchange Server 0.8.2 provides key messaging functions like email, calendaring, contacts and task management -- fully integrated with advanced groupware features such as document sharing, project tracking, user forums, and a knowledge base. Open-Xchange Server 0.8.2 offers major productivity improvements through object “linking’ and ‘permissioning’ and works with all common web browsers.

“Open-Xchange appreciates the help and support of its community and is giving something back," said Dan Kusnetzky, executive vice president Marketing Strategy for Open-Xchange. "The Open-Xchange community edition 0.8.2 is giving community members the enhancements found in Service Pack 1 for the commercial version of Open-Xchange Server.”

Creative Commons Deed
The combination of the Free Software Foundation’s GPL and the Creative Commons Organization’s Creative Commons Deed allows Open-Xchange, Inc. to share both the Open-Xchange Server content and the source code with the community. The icons, menus and other copyrighted content that makes up the community edition of Open-Xchange server is now being made available through a Creative Commons Deed.

The full legal code of Creative Commons License “Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5” can be found on the Creative Commons web site
(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/legalcode).

Upgrades include:
● GUI and usability enhancements for Contacts and Calendar including new Calendar look-and-feel, customizable layout for contact lists and extended print functionality for selected contacts.
● Optimized Outlook Support for public and shared folders, attachments and distribution lists
● MySQL support
● Enhanced interfaces for both Voice over IP and Text over IP applications including Skype
● Optimized SyncML support allowing any SyncML enabled device or handheld to share information with Open-Xchange
● Extended search capabilities allowing users search across all Open-Xchange modules
● Improved visualization of projects in the project management module — including GANTT chart support
● Distributed Mail Server Support providing higher levels of availability and better performance
● Enhanced directory service integration making it easier for Open-Xchange to take part in established organizational networks
● Better support for Java 1.5
● iCAL improvements allowing calendar synchronization with most iCAL enabled calendar management systems.
● RSS feed support allowing users to gather information from network news sources
● Security Enhancements to protect both the connections between client systems and the Open-Xchange server and the Open-Xchange server and the network

For a detailed list of new features please visit http://mirror.open-xchange.org/ox/EN/community/CHANGES.htm.

About the Community Edition of Open-Xchange Server
Open-Xchange Server is one of the most active and fastest growing open source projects to date. Launched in August 2004, Open-Xchange Server now ranks #5 out of 358 groupware projects on freshmeat.net website, #1 in document repositories, #4 in handhelds, and overall #178 out of 40,522 listed projects. The Open-Xchange community website, www.open-xchange.org, is visited by 170,000 unique visitors each month, the GPL version of Open-Xchange Server is downloaded more than 9,000 times each month.

About Open-Xchange Inc.
Open-Xchange Inc. delivers Smart Collaboration™ in the form of reliable and scalable groupware, collaboration, and messaging solutions. Its flagship product, Open-Xchange Server, is the market-leading collaboration server that combines best-of-breed open source software with commercial software add-ons and connectors. Open-Xchange Server is among the most popular and most active open source projects in the world today. Open-Xchange Inc. is headquartered in Tarrytown, NY, with research & development and operations concentrated in Olpe and Nuremberg, Germany. For more information, please visit www.open-xchange.com.

About Creative Commons
Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that offers flexible copyright licenses for creative works. Creative Commons deeds provide a flexible range of protection and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators. We have built upon the "all rights reserved" concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary "some rights reserved" approach. For more information, please visit www.creativecommons.org.

Contact:
Dan Kusnetzky, Open-Xchange, Inc., 941 918-1824, dan.kusnetzky@open-xchange.com

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