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Tux Machines Turns 10 in Exactly One Month

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A drunken penguin

THIS past week was not a bad week at all. There was lots to cover (without compromising focus and s/n ratio) and it was our biggest week ever (since we carried on from Susan) in terms of traffic, with as many visitors in 5.5 days as in the previous record for a week (7 days). Based on whois, the Creation Date of Tux Machines is 2004-06-10 05:40:40, so we are exactly a month away from an important anniversary.

We don't track visitors, we just look at the size of uncached traffic logs (no unique IPs, only one IP -- that of the Varnish server -- is shown for everyone) before they are deleted for good, which would be every 4-5 weeks (logrotate). Privacy preservation is a conscious decision for us.

Thanks to everyone for choosing us for news. We enjoy running the site and we hope you enjoy following it. Running the site requires a lot of dedication, including posting while out of the house (wirelessly) or staying up late at night to catch up with the latest headlines. Rianne sometimes stays awake until 3 AM because she wants to ensure readers are being informed.

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Congrats :)

The website is looking better every day Smile

Thanks for the best Linux news on the net.

Thanks to Roy Rianne and initially Susan for a great job. Congratulations on making it 10 years. Not bad in this throwaway every 6 months age. Smile

Ray

Thanks

Thanks, much appreciated.

10 years?

Wow, I just wish that I had known of it sooner. (I wish I had tried Linux sooner) This is my "GoTo" place to learn more about Linux and find out what is going on! CONGRATULATIONS

Early adopter

In the desktop space, every new user of GNU/Linux is still an "early adopter". Smile

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