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Interview With Jennifer Cloer, Director of Communications at The Linux Foundation

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Linux
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Jennifer Cloer

TUX MACHINES has caught up with Jennifer Cloer, who is the director of communications at The Linux Foundation. Our short interview focuses on Linux in devices and some of the existing challenges.


Tux Machines: As the growth of Linux accelerates, especially on devices, patent pressure intensifies. Short of patent reform, which is seemingly too slow to arrive, how can one counter threats to the zero-cost advantage of Linux?

Jennifer Cloer: Certainly, we have to be mindful of patent issues, as does anyone working in the software industry, whether they work on open source or proprietary software. It is an issue. But given the massive community that supports and depends on Linux, there are hundreds of companies and thousands of developers invested in Linux and prepared to defend the operating system every day.

TM: Android is becoming the de facto standard platform in several areas, but it is also the carrier of many proprietary apps. How do the mobile Linux platforms backed by the Linux Foundation distinguish themselves from this?

JC: The Linux Foundation supports and “backs” all Linux-based platforms. The more people building with Linux and contributing back to the kernel, the better for everyone. Platforms will distinguish themselves in a number of ways but that will be determined by the communities, developers and companies supporting those platforms.

TM: Short of lobbying, how can one help politicians or CIOs grasp the advantages of software that they have full control over?

JC: Governments and CIOs understand the advantages now more than ever. Governments around the world are embracing open source and have been for years now. CIOs are increasingly using Linux and open source as the building blocks for their enterprises, especially as the cloud has become so prominent. In our latest Enterprise End User Report, 80 percent of users said they would increase their use of Linux over the next five years; just 20 percent said they would increase their use of Windows during the same time period.

TM: The Linux Foundation recently organised events in Europe, including the UK. Are there plans of expanding such initiatives?

JC: The Linux Foundation hosts LinuxCon and CloudOpen in Europe every year. This year we’ll be in Dusseldorf October 13-15, 2014. We will continue to host other events in Europe, too, such as Embedded Linux Conference and KVM Forum. We’ll also host ApacheCon and CloudStack Conference in Europe in Budapest on November 17-21, 2014.

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