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SuSE Linux 10.1 RC3 Report

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OpenSuSE released rc3 of their upcoming SuSE Linux 10.1 yesterday right on target as planned and reported on the Roadmap. I thought rc2 was just about gold worthy myself and was anxious to see the changelog for rc3. Well, they disappointed me on a few issues but all in all, they are probably getting closer to that final release.

The first disappointment came in the form of my preferred install method of hard drive installs. If I had to burn cds for each release, I'd be out about 60 cdrs by now. As such, I almost always utilize the hard drive install method when possible for any distro, not just SuSE. Well, my first attempt at a hard drve install of rc3 bombed out at the first summary screen when the installer could not read the sources catalogue. So choosing or installing any software was impossible.

So, I thought this might be a perfect opportunity to test the system upgrade capabilities of 10.1. I booted rc2 and updated the sources and found that the system update could not read the source catalogue either. The online update tried to work, but hung at 26% for a coupla hours - so I figured it wasn't going to complete either.

As a last resort, I burnt the 5 cdrs of SuSE Linux and the install proceded just fine. It was the same exact process we've described several times now and I suffered no glitches with even the net connection test or the online update configuration.

The system booted just fine as well and most of the yast components are functioning well. I tested the system update, but as a fresh install, there wasn't going to be much to test there. The online update module seemed to hang at the point it was going to download the patches I chose to test. I left it quite a while and it never did download them. Through the software manager, the online update selection did function properly and my patches were downloaded and installed. Other packages from local sources also installed with no issues. All in all, the software management suite is working ..mostly. I'm not sure what the difference is between choosing Online Update from the Yast Control Center or chosing online update in the Software Manager, but this is what happened here.

        

All regular applications opened, closed, and seemed to function well and hardware detection or manual setup went well too. My scanner wasn't properly autodetected as it didn't work until I went back in and selected my model manually by hand. As always I have to set my tv card manually and afterwhich it worked as desired.

Again, as always, SuSE is rock solid and has a very professional feel in actual use. Its performance is well above average, especially considering the size of its full featured install. Some folks might call it bloated, I call it full-featured. It's still a marvel of modern operating system development.

...Even if they managed to leave out the changelog. I'm not sure why or how, but the changelog included with this release consisted of items from Apr 2004 through Aug 2004. And that's it. I even searched the Factory mirrors and the changelog included there is completely empty. Nothing. Who's in charge of those changelogs anyway!? Big Grin

    

So, I guess we may never know what was changed from rc2 to rc3. Or perhaps the next release will bring us an updated changelog and we can investigate then. As it is, all we can surmize is that they either changed the location or the format of their installation file catalog. They apparently adjusted their regular gui installer, but once again overlooked the other alternative methods.

One other obvious change is the update of Firefox to version 1.5.0.3. The gang at OpenSuSE was right on the ball with that security update and users can rest assured in that area. The kernel version is now a 2.6.16.11, which if memory serves is also the latest security updated release as well.

So, some software version highlights can include:

  • kernel-source-2.6.16.11-4.i586.rpm

  • gcc-4.1.0-22.i586.rpm
  • python-2.4.2-16.i586.rpm
  • qt3-3.3.5-56.i586.rpm
  • perl-5.8.8-12.i586.rpm
  • xorg-x11-6.9.0-44.i586.rpm
  • kdebase3-3.5.1-67.i586.rpm
  • gnome-desktop-2.12.2-21.i586.rpm
  • OpenOffice_org-2.0.2-20.i586.rpm
  • gaim-1.5.0-48.i586.rpm
  • MozillaFirefox-1.5.0.3-4.i586.rpm
  • MozillaThunderbird-1.5-25.i586.rpm
  • xgl-cvs_060419-5.i586.rpm
  • libsvg-cairo-0.1.6-14.i586.rpm
  • compiz-cvs_060421-9.i586.rpm
  • alsa-1.0.11-29.i586.rpm
  • Full RPMlist.

        

The Most Annoying Bug List is again at a bare minimum, and in fact is almost a carbon copy of last release's:

    For RC3 there are only delta isos against RC2 and RC1. Have a look at the Applying Delta ISOs section of the Download Instructions how to use them.

    • Language dependent packages for the default language are not installed Bug 162064

    • YaST2 does not show the package description/summary for a lot of packages
    • The source with updates is added twice Bug 170113

    A special Add-On CD with non-OSS software is available as well

Well, that's about it this time. No major changes except in the update process to rc3 and hard drive installs due to a presumed change in the software catalogs. No changelog offered to the users this time leads to further disappointment for all. They did make some important security updates of key software packages. Once again, the system seems almost fully functional, stable, and just about goldmaster material. At this time we are still only given the "it will be announced when ready" for that blessed event.

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