Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SuSE Linux 10.1 RC3 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

OpenSuSE released rc3 of their upcoming SuSE Linux 10.1 yesterday right on target as planned and reported on the Roadmap. I thought rc2 was just about gold worthy myself and was anxious to see the changelog for rc3. Well, they disappointed me on a few issues but all in all, they are probably getting closer to that final release.

The first disappointment came in the form of my preferred install method of hard drive installs. If I had to burn cds for each release, I'd be out about 60 cdrs by now. As such, I almost always utilize the hard drive install method when possible for any distro, not just SuSE. Well, my first attempt at a hard drve install of rc3 bombed out at the first summary screen when the installer could not read the sources catalogue. So choosing or installing any software was impossible.

So, I thought this might be a perfect opportunity to test the system upgrade capabilities of 10.1. I booted rc2 and updated the sources and found that the system update could not read the source catalogue either. The online update tried to work, but hung at 26% for a coupla hours - so I figured it wasn't going to complete either.

As a last resort, I burnt the 5 cdrs of SuSE Linux and the install proceded just fine. It was the same exact process we've described several times now and I suffered no glitches with even the net connection test or the online update configuration.

The system booted just fine as well and most of the yast components are functioning well. I tested the system update, but as a fresh install, there wasn't going to be much to test there. The online update module seemed to hang at the point it was going to download the patches I chose to test. I left it quite a while and it never did download them. Through the software manager, the online update selection did function properly and my patches were downloaded and installed. Other packages from local sources also installed with no issues. All in all, the software management suite is working ..mostly. I'm not sure what the difference is between choosing Online Update from the Yast Control Center or chosing online update in the Software Manager, but this is what happened here.

        

All regular applications opened, closed, and seemed to function well and hardware detection or manual setup went well too. My scanner wasn't properly autodetected as it didn't work until I went back in and selected my model manually by hand. As always I have to set my tv card manually and afterwhich it worked as desired.

Again, as always, SuSE is rock solid and has a very professional feel in actual use. Its performance is well above average, especially considering the size of its full featured install. Some folks might call it bloated, I call it full-featured. It's still a marvel of modern operating system development.

...Even if they managed to leave out the changelog. I'm not sure why or how, but the changelog included with this release consisted of items from Apr 2004 through Aug 2004. And that's it. I even searched the Factory mirrors and the changelog included there is completely empty. Nothing. Who's in charge of those changelogs anyway!? Big Grin

    

So, I guess we may never know what was changed from rc2 to rc3. Or perhaps the next release will bring us an updated changelog and we can investigate then. As it is, all we can surmize is that they either changed the location or the format of their installation file catalog. They apparently adjusted their regular gui installer, but once again overlooked the other alternative methods.

One other obvious change is the update of Firefox to version 1.5.0.3. The gang at OpenSuSE was right on the ball with that security update and users can rest assured in that area. The kernel version is now a 2.6.16.11, which if memory serves is also the latest security updated release as well.

So, some software version highlights can include:

  • kernel-source-2.6.16.11-4.i586.rpm

  • gcc-4.1.0-22.i586.rpm
  • python-2.4.2-16.i586.rpm
  • qt3-3.3.5-56.i586.rpm
  • perl-5.8.8-12.i586.rpm
  • xorg-x11-6.9.0-44.i586.rpm
  • kdebase3-3.5.1-67.i586.rpm
  • gnome-desktop-2.12.2-21.i586.rpm
  • OpenOffice_org-2.0.2-20.i586.rpm
  • gaim-1.5.0-48.i586.rpm
  • MozillaFirefox-1.5.0.3-4.i586.rpm
  • MozillaThunderbird-1.5-25.i586.rpm
  • xgl-cvs_060419-5.i586.rpm
  • libsvg-cairo-0.1.6-14.i586.rpm
  • compiz-cvs_060421-9.i586.rpm
  • alsa-1.0.11-29.i586.rpm
  • Full RPMlist.

        

The Most Annoying Bug List is again at a bare minimum, and in fact is almost a carbon copy of last release's:

    For RC3 there are only delta isos against RC2 and RC1. Have a look at the Applying Delta ISOs section of the Download Instructions how to use them.

    • Language dependent packages for the default language are not installed Bug 162064

    • YaST2 does not show the package description/summary for a lot of packages
    • The source with updates is added twice Bug 170113

    A special Add-On CD with non-OSS software is available as well

Well, that's about it this time. No major changes except in the update process to rc3 and hard drive installs due to a presumed change in the software catalogs. No changelog offered to the users this time leads to further disappointment for all. They did make some important security updates of key software packages. Once again, the system seems almost fully functional, stable, and just about goldmaster material. At this time we are still only given the "it will be announced when ready" for that blessed event.

More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Leap 15 Will Succeed 42.3

What comes after openSUSE Leap 42.3 for SUSE's community non-rolling distribution? Version 15. Richard Brown announced on the behalf of the openSUSE Board and Leap Release Manager that the next version after openSUSE Leap 42.3 will be openSUSE Leap 15. Yes, that's after pre-42 was openSUSE 13.2. Read more Also: Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-project (15 mails)

Leftovers: Software

  • GNU Guile 2.2.1 released
    We are happy to announce GNU Guile release 2.2.1, the first bug-fix release in the new 2.2 stable release series.
  • Announcing Nylas Mail 2.0 [Ed: just Electron]
  • Cerebro Is An Amazing Open Source OS X Spotlight Alternative For Linux [Ed: also just Electron]
    You may be fed up with traditional way of searching/opening applications on your system. Cerebro is an amazing utility built using Electron and available for Linux, Windows, and Mac. It is open-source and released under MIT license.
  • Flowblade Another Video Editor for Linux? Give It A Try!
    You may have favorite video editor to edit your videos but there is no harm to try something new, its initial release was not that long, with time it made some great improvements. It can be bit hard to master this video editor but if you are not new in this field you can make it easily and will be total worth of time.
  • Get System Info from CLI Using `NeoFetch` Tool in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Ukuu Kernel Manager Utility lets You Upgrade or Install Kernels in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are many ways to upgrade your Linux Kernel using Synaptics, command line and so. The Ukuu utility is the simply solution to manager your Ubuntu/Linux Mint kernels. If you want to test new fixes in the Linux Kernel then you can install Mainline Kernels released by Ubuntu team but mainline Kernels are intended to use for testing purposes only (so be careful).
  • 10 Reasons Why You Should Use Vi/Vim Text Editor in Linux
    While working with Linux systems, there are several areas where you’ll need to use a text editor including programming/scripting, editing configuration/text files, to mention but a few. There are several remarkable text editors you’ll find out there for Linux-based operating systems.
  • OpenShot 2.3 Linux Video Editor New Features
    It’s been quite some time since we last talked about OpenShot, and more specifically when it had its second major release. Recently, the team behind the popular open source video editor has made its third point release available which happens to come with a couple of exciting new features and tools, so here is a quick guide on where to find them and how to use them.
  • Boostnote: Another Great Note Taking App for Developers? Find Out By Yourself
    Boostnote is an open-source note-taking application especially made for programmers and developers, it is build up with Electron framework and cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Being programmers, we take lots of notes which includes commands, code snippets, bug information and so on. It all comes in handy when you have organized them all in one place, Boostnote does this job very well. It lets you organize your notes in folders with tags, so you can find anything you are looking for very quickly.
  • Collabora Office 5.3 Released
    Today we released Collabora Office 5.3 and Collabora GovOffice 5.3, which contain great new features and enhancements. They also contains all fixes from the upstream libreoffice-5-3 branch and several backported features.

Virtualization and Containers

GNOME News