Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

20 Arrested in Crackdown on Internet Drugs

Filed under
Web
Legal

Twenty people in the United States and abroad were arrested on charges they ran Internet pharmacies that illegally shipped narcotics, steroids and amphetamines to teenagers and other buyers around the world, federal authorities announced Wednesday.

The arrests were the result of a yearlong investigation by six federal agencies of online pharmacies that often operate in the shadows of the Internet, with no fixed address and no way to track where they are located, Drug Enforcement Administrator Karen Tandy said.

The drugs were shipped to buyers with little or no effort to verify ages or medical need, allowing teenagers or drug abusers easy access to addictive and dangerous drugs, officials said.

Tandy and officials from the FBI, Customs, the Internal Revenue Service, Food and Drug Administration and the Postal Service were to formally announce details of Operation Cyber Chase at a news conference Wednesday.

Among the organizations targeted was a Philadelphia-based Internet pharmacy that allegedly smuggled prescription painkillers, steroids and amphetamines into the United States from India, Germany, Hungary and elsewhere, repackaged them and sold them throughout the world, Tandy said.

U.S. arrests took place in Fort Lauderdale and Sarasota, Fla.; Abilene and Tyler, Texas; New York City and Rochester, N.Y.; Philadelphia; and Greenville, S.C. Authorities also made arrests in Australia, Costa Rica and India.

A study by the Government Accountability Office last year found it was easy to order drugs online. Some drugs received from foreign pharmacies were counterfeit and many came with no instructions or warnings, the GAO said. Others arrived in damaged or unconventional packaging.

The FDA has led the government's enforcement efforts against Internet pharmacies as part of its strenuous opposition to the legalization of imported prescription drugs.

By MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press Writer

More in Tux Machines

Compulab Utilite2 Ubuntu mini PC now available for $192 and up

CompuLab’s Utilite2 is a tiny computer with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processor and support for Ubuntu Linux or Google Android software. The company unveiled the 3.4″ x 2.3″ x 1.1″ computer in December, and now it’s available for purchase. Read more

Shuttleworth says Ubuntu’s future is more exciting than space travel

What now feels like a very long time ago was actually only a handful of years. Back in 2010, Canonical knew exactly what its future would hold and had a plan on how to get there. It wanted to build one OS for all devices: phones, TVs, tablets, the desktop, servers and beyond. It wanted the device to be irrelevant and the OS to be agnostic. Unfortunately, while the company knew exactly what it was doing, its loyal Ubuntu desktop user base didn’t. Read more

Valve develops its own Intel graphics driver for Linux

Valve has developed its own Intel Vulkan GPU graphics driver for Linux that they intend to open-source. The Vulkan API is still being argued about and will not be finalised until later this year, but Valve has been developing their own Intel GPU reference driver for Vulkan to help early adopters boot-strap their code. Read more

Tiny IoT SBC runs Linux, offers Arduino compatibility

The credit card sized, open-spec Udoo Neo SBC features Freescale’s Cortex-M4-enhanced i.MX6 SoloX, plus Arduino compatibility, WiFi, Bluetooth, and sensors. Read more