Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interview with Kevin Carmony, CEO of Linspire

Filed under

DW: Kevin, thank you very much for your time. The Freespire announcement came as a surprise to many in the Linux community. Can you tell us what prompted the launch of a free edition of Linspire and why do you think this is the right time to announce it?

KC: I just hit my one-year anniversary as CEO for Linspire, but I have been with the company since the beginning, employee number one, and we're just hitting our 5th year. Wow! It's hard to believe I've been doing this for that long! We've had a fun and interesting history, starting back in the "Lindows" days, but we've had a lot of success and accomplished much. Today over 350 OEMs sell computers pre-installed with Linspire Linux and retailers such as Wal-Mart, Fry's, Micro Center, Target, and Sears are selling these computers.

We've learned a lot during the last five years, and two of the most important lessons were: 1) the open source and Linux community needs Linspire, and 2) Linspire needs the open source and Linux community. We've known the latter for a long time, and we started the Freespire project internally about two years ago. However, I think the timing is now right for us to do what we're trying to do with Freespire. Had we tried this a few years ago, I think a larger part of the open source community would have not understood why we were offering proprietary software as an option in the core distribution. Today, the vast majority not only understand this need, they welcome it. When I announced this at Desktop Linux Summit to hundreds of people, I didn't hear a single "Boo!" or "Hissss!" from anyone, but I saw a lot of heads nodding in agreement and heard a lot of applause.

DW: I guess you had discussed the idea with Michael Robertson (the founder of Lindows and Linspire). What was his reaction? Does he still take an active interest in Linspire or has he moved on to other projects?

Full Interview.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • LZHAM Is Still Ticking Along To Further Open-Source Lossless Compression
    It's been nearly one year since last talking about LZHAM, the lossless data compression codec designed by a former Valve developer and has been showing great potential -- particularly by game developers for compressing assets. While LZHAM news has been quiet, Rich Geldreich has still been hard at work on advancing open-source lossless compression.
  • Pick of the Bunch: Cloud Development Tools
    Cloud computing is not simply a popular phrase; it is a very important part of how we use technology. Cloud computing is the practice of using a network of remote servers hosted on the Internet to store, manage, and process data, rather than a local server or a personal computer. The cloud eliminates maintenance and management issues, and eliminates the risk of running out of capacity. Cloud-based applications also have the virtue of being accessible from any location with an internet connection. And Linux continues to demonstrate that it is the go-to cloud platform. Developers need a broad set of powerful tools to use the cloud. There are far too many excellent cloud development tools, and this is not an exhaustive survey. But here are four excellent tools that caught our eye. The first is Dirigible; don't be put off by its name.
  • podlators 4.00
    podlators is the distribution that includes the Pod::Man and Pod::Text modules for Perl, plus the pod2man and pod2text driver scripts (among a few other, more minor things).

Radeon DRM Linux 4.4 + Mesa 11.1 + DRI3 vs. AMD's Proprietary Driver

On Friday I posted benchmarks showing Nouveau's re-clocked performance relative to NVIDIA's proprietary driver for showing the performance potential of NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 600/700 series with the performance state code there beginning to work. That article was followed by AMDGPU driver tests on Linux 4.4 against Catalyst for the newest AMD GPU tech that uses this newer Direct Rendering Manager driver. The third test now is comparing the Radeon DRM performance on Linux 4.4 against AMD's binary blob when using older AMD GCN GPUs as well as a Northern Islands GPU for reference. Read more

Sabayon 15.12 Updates Plasma 5, GNOME 3.18 Goes Into Testing

Sabayon Linux continues to be one of the easiest ways to setup a Gentoo-based environment. With Sabayon 15.12, GNOME 3.18 packages were added to their testing repositories, KDE Plasma 5 was updated against KDE Frameworks 5.16 and KDE Plasma 5.4.3, and there is support inbound for ARM. The Sabayon project intends to release Raspberry Pi 2 images in the near future. Read more Also: Gentoo-Based Sabayon Linux 15.12 Is Out, Raspberry Pi 2 Version Incoming

Solus Operating System Gets a Fix for Acer C720 Boot

The Solus developers have been working to fix a problem with their system on the famous Acer C720 laptop. It might not seem like a big deal, but that’s only for people who don’t have an Acer C720. Read more