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Tux Machines is 10

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A lot has happened since Susan started the site and we are grateful for her legacy, which the Wayback Machine can show. In the coming years we will try to make more improvements in the way we pick news quickly and the way the news is presented or organised.

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Congrats :)

Congrats on the hard work Smile

Amazing

I miss seeing Susan around here, but you've done well to keep the site active and interesting. Long live Tux Machines!

srlinuxx will ALWAYS waddle

srlinuxx will ALWAYS waddle the waddle! She'll be very missed. I hope she logs in occasionally and lets her fans know she's still kickin'. Smile

Dr. Roy and Rianne are doing a great job of keeping the Tux Machine will oiled and running efficiently.

Looking forward to many years of informative reading and interaction here.

~V. T. Eric Layton (aka Nocturnal Slacker, vtel57)
http://vtel57.com

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Vulkan, AMDGPU and AMDVLK

  • A Vulkan Extension Is Being Worked On To Acquire Exclusive Control Of A Wayland Display

    Drew DeVault of Sway/WLROOTS fame has been dabbling with his first Vulkan extension as part of work with other upstream Wayland developers on DRM lease support and better supporting VR headsets under Wayland. Being worked on in-step with DRM lease protocol support for Wayland, Drew is also drafting a "VK_EXT_acquire_wl_display" extension for Vulkan. That new extension is akin to VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display for X11 but for working on Wayland. The existing VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extension allows a Vulkan application / game engine to take exclusive control of a display currently associated with an X11 screen. This goes along with the DRM lease support and was spearheaded by Red Hat, Valve, NVIDIA, and Intel as part of Steam VR support on Linux.

  • AMDGPU DC Gets A Number Of Fixes For Navi & Other Clean-Ups

    The past few weeks while AMD open-source developers were busy getting their Navi enablement code public and aligned for the Linux 5.3 merge window, the display core "DC" frequent code drops ceased. Every so often AMD developers volley their DC patches from their internal development trees to the public mailing list for queuing ahead of the next cycle. Now that Navi is out there and getting stabilized, they've issued a new set of DC patches and it's coming in heavy. Given that it's been a while during Navi review and upstreaming, the AMDGPU DC patches sent out on Monday are 87 patches that add nearly ten thousand lines of new code.

  • AMDVLK 2019.Q3.2 Released With Navi 10 Support

    Just over one week after the Radeon RX 5700/5700XT "Navi" graphics cards began shipping, the AMDVLK open-source AMD Radeon Vulkan Linux driver support is now available for these first RDNA offerings. AMDVLK is the official open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver and is based on the same sources as the Windows/Linux Radeon Software Vulkan driver. The open-source AMDVLK, however, uses their LLVM-based shader compiler rather than AMD's long-standing proprietary shader compiler. AMDVLK is an alternative to the Mesa RADV Vulkan driver maintained by the "community" (principally, Red Hat, Google, and Valve) that did see launch-day support last week for Navi.

Arduino from the Command Line: Break Free from the GUI with Git and Vim!

The word "Arduino" often invokes a wide range of opinions and sometimes emotion. For many, it represents a very low bar to entry into the world of microcontrollers. This world before 2003 often required costly, obscure and closed-source development tools. Arduino has been a great equalizer, blowing the doors off the walled garden. Arduino now represents a huge ecosystem of hardware that speaks a (mostly) common language and eases transition from one hardware platform to another. Today, if you are a company that sells microcontrollers, it's in your best interest to get your dev boards working with Arduino. It offers a low-friction path to getting your products into lots of hands quickly. It's also important to note that Arduino's simplicity does not inhibit digging deep into the microcontroller. Nothing stops you from directly twiddling registers and using advanced features. It does, however, decrease your portability between boards. Read more Also: First the E-Bike, Next the Flying Car

Games: Emberlight, Rings of Saturn, Defend The Keep, Path of Titans, Kind Words, Kingdoms of the Dump

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