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SymplyOS Leaf Is a Light and Interesting Distro Based on openSUSE

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SUSE

There are so many Linux distributions in the world that sometimes it's difficult to keep track of each and every one of them. Despite what people might think about Linux distros, the truth is that most of them are actually uninteresting and of sub-par quality.

People are used to the quality of systems like Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, or openSUSE, but not all distros have been created equal. In fact, users wouldn't install such distros because they simply lack a team with the manpower to make the operating system interesting.

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Ubuntu 16.04 vs. vs. Clear Linux vs. openSUSE vs. Scientific Linux 7

Here are some extra Linux distribution benchmarks for your viewing pleasure this weekend. Following the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS last week, I was running another fresh performance comparison of various Linux distributions on my powerful Xeon E3-1270 v5 Skylake system. I made it a few Linux distributions in before the motherboard faced an untimely death. Not sure of the cause yet, but the motherboard is kaput and thus the testing was ended prematurely. Read more