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Mandriva Linux 2006 for home users

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What can a Linux distribution such as Mandriva Linux 2006 mean to a Windows user? Is it a valuable alternative, or do you have to be a real computer nerd to risk the move?

Why would an average PC user make the effort to change over to Linux? Admitted, not necessarily everyone will benefit from such a move. But it might be a lot more interesting than you might suspect. A lot of arguments regarding this topic often lead to a lot of debate. In this article we do not pretend to own the truth or to be complete. This article just sums up our own experiences after several years of use of as well Windows as Mandriva Linux. We wrote them with our Mandriva experiences in mind, but most modern Linux distributions offer the same benefits.

Mandriva is such a user friendly distro that has added a lot of graphical aids that allow you to administrate and configure your system. It is really a distro that considers home users as a prime target user base.

Mandriva allows you to get started with Linux with relative ease, to get to know more of the system piece by piece, and adapt it more and more according to your own wishes. Mandriva Linux has a very good and helpful user community which is a big advantage to get the best out of your distro. It's not for nothing that Mandriva is always well rated on http://distrowatch.com/. It recently won the Tux Magazine Distribution Smackdown that was rating distros largely on usability for new users.

Mandriva Linux offers a real lot of software packages (that are all updated, see our earlier comments on security). For about all applications for home users, the best packages are present.

Mandriva is a distribution that is able to find a reasonable balance between the newest versions (with the newest functionalities) and sufficient stability. Also the Mandriva installer can hardly be improved. And in the 2006 version also the eye got a treat with a nice look'n feel.

Full Story.

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