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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • vtclock: Yes, one more console clock can’t hurt
  • vux: Playing the odds, against all odds

    I’m counting up the many things vux has working against it, and wondering how I managed to get this screenshot at all.

  • Bonus: V is for vanquished
  • vimwiki: The reason, in due season
  • vlock: The simplest screensaver I know
  • Vim plugins for developers

    The popular Vim editor provides users with a vast set of features from the get-go, and you can further enhance its capabilities via plugins. If you're a programmer, check out the following plugins, which can help you do things such as check syntax errors from within the code, browse the source code, and switch to the header file corresponding to the current file.

  • vit: That full-screen interface I promised
  • Betty: Turn Generic English Into Linux Terminal Commands

    The Linux terminal can be a complex beast, and it would be handy to have something like Siri to help make things easier. Sure, there’s often no need to go into the terminal for regular users, but there are some advantages to using the terminal over the graphical user interface. You can do a lot of things with the terminal that aren’t as easy to do in graphical user interfaces – besides, there’s just this odd nerdy pleasure in doing as much as possible from a command line interface.

  • Just play videos with Snappy on Fedora

    Snappy is a minimal application that does one thing — plays videos. Snappy is a super-minimal video player with a neat on-screen display, and that’s about it, here is no other interface in the application. Snappy has no library feature that keeps all your videos, no list of previously played videos, no menus, not even a open video dialog — to play a video, you either tell a video to open in snappy via your file browser or drag and drop a video file to the snappy window. Snappy is also built on the GStreamer framework, so it will support any files that you have GStreamer plugins for.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Graphics: Mesa and Gallium3D

Ubuntu 16.10 Doesn't Change Much With Performance, Clear Linux Still Leads In Most Tests

Given yesterday's Ubuntu 16.10 final beta release ahead of the official "Yakkety Yak" debut in two weeks, I decided to run some benchmarks of Ubuntu 16.10 compared to Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS on the same system plus also throwing in the Intel Clear Linux distribution given it tends to be one of the most performant. For those that haven't yet tried out Ubuntu 16.10 nor followed its development, GCC 6.2 is now the default compiler in place of GCC 5.4 from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Mesa 12.0.3 provides the stock graphics drivers and Linux 4.8 is the stock kernel. Read more Also: DDR4 Memory Speed Tests With The Core i7 6800K On Ubuntu Linux

Mozilla's Rust 1.12

  • Announcing Rust 1.12
    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.12. Rust is a systems programming language with the slogan “fast, reliable, productive: pick three.” As always, you can install Rust 1.12 from the appropriate page on our website, and check out the detailed release notes for 1.12 on GitHub. 1361 patches were landed in this release.
  • Rust 1.12 Programming Language Released
    Rust 1.12 has been released as the newest version of this popular programming language with a focus on "fast, reliable, productive: pick three."

Linux Devices

  • Raspberry Pi Foundation Unveils New LXDE-Based Desktop for Raspbian Called PIXEL
    Today, September 28, 2016, Raspberry Pi Foundation's Simon Long proudly unveiled a new desktop environment for the Debian-based Raspbian GNU/Linux operating system for Raspberry Pi devices. Until today, Raspbian shiped with the well-known and lightweight LXDE desktop environment, which looks pretty much the same as on any other Linux-based distribution out there that is built around LXDE (Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment). But Simon Long, a UX engineer working for Raspberry Pi Foundation was hired to make it better, transform it into something that's more appealing to users.
  • MintBox Mini updated with faster AMD SoC and 8GB RAM
    CompuLab’s Linux Mint flavored MintBox Mini Pro mini-PC updates the Mini with an AMD A10 Micro-6700T, plus BT 4.0, mini-PCIe, and twice the RAM and storage. The CompuLab built, $395 MintBox Mini Pro, which ships with the Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon distribution, updates the $295 MintBox Mini with a lot more performance and features in the same compact 108 x 83 x 24mm footprint. That’s considerably smaller than earlier collaborations between CompuLab and the Linux Mint project, such as the circa-2013 MintBox 2.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro
    MintBox Mini Pro The new model is called “Mintbox Mini Pro”, it’s just as small as the original Mintbox Mini but with much better specifications.