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MPlayer interview

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Interviews

I requested an interview from the MPlayer team, and today I got a reply mail: "We're ready!", and few hours later I was talking about their award-winning software with

Alex Beregszaszi - Project Maintainer

Diego Biurrun - Project Maintainer, Server Admin

Oded Shimon - General MPlayer Developer, mainly MEncoder

Me: How was MPlayer born? In case of many programs there are serious things (in most cases the lack of something) which inspire the developers. What was that for MPlayer?

Alex: As none of us was who started it, we can only share our viewpoints of this. First Arpi just hacked xmmp (x multimedia player), but later decided to write his own, based on some libraries. The real shot was FFmpeg, however. The project was started in 2000.

Diego: It was the lack of a good multimedia player for Linux, Arpi found the players at the time to be buggy, feature-lacking, or all of the above.

Oded: I'm a general developer. I have little bits in most major components in MPlayer and MEncoder. I don't maintain many parts.

Me: What's your post at the MPlayer team?

Full Story.

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