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The big takeaway from Google I/O: Linux everywhere

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Linux
Google

I was wondering what was ‘L’ in Android, until someone pointed out “maybe it’s Linux”. In all honestly I don’t think it’s L for Linux, but a wishful thinking doesn’t hurt given the fact that Google is putting Linux ‘everywhere’.

Linus Torvalds may have never dreamt of this day when he sent out that email back in 1991 and said, “I’m doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones.”

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  • Linux is Everywhere - Supercomputers to Mobile Phones

    Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, writing for ZDNet, once again reminds us that Linux dominates supercomputers. SJVN linked to the latest Top500 group results, showing Linux makes up for 97% of the five hundred fastest computers in the world. This is the biggest of the big iron, the top supercomputer has 1,024,000 GB of RAM and 3,120,000 Intel Xeon cores, running Kylin Linux.

    With Linux being the clear OS of choice among the hot rod builders, where does proprietary Unix fit into the picture? Increasingly, the answer appears to be that it doesn't.

  • Linux Nears Total Domination of the Top500 Supercomputers

    Not only does Linux power all of the top 10 machines on the June 2014 list -- including China's winning Tianhe-2, which stole the show once again with its performance of 33.86 Petaflop/second (Pflop/s) on the Linpack benchmark -- but it also now accounts for a full 97 percent of the full set of 500. A mere 15 supercomputers on the list *don't* use Linux, including 12 using Unix and just two using Windows. (The last one is described simply as "Mixed.")

  • Google I/O Offers Devs Big Bonanza

    Google on Wednesday kicked off its I/O conference in San Francisco, presenting devs with a dizzying array of possibilities: a new design language for Android L; a boatload of new apps, APIs and SDKs; and expanded support for a variety of architectural and hardware configurations. "If I were a developer, I would feel real good about opportunities today," said ABI analyst Jeff Orr.

  • Google debuts Android L (5.0), plus wearable, auto, TV versions

    At Google I/O, Google previewed Android 5.0′s new UI, and also unveiled Android TV and Android Auto, while offering new details on Android Wear.

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