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The big takeaway from Google I/O: Linux everywhere

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Linux
Google

I was wondering what was ‘L’ in Android, until someone pointed out “maybe it’s Linux”. In all honestly I don’t think it’s L for Linux, but a wishful thinking doesn’t hurt given the fact that Google is putting Linux ‘everywhere’.

Linus Torvalds may have never dreamt of this day when he sent out that email back in 1991 and said, “I’m doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones.”

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  • Linux is Everywhere - Supercomputers to Mobile Phones

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  • Google I/O Offers Devs Big Bonanza

    Google on Wednesday kicked off its I/O conference in San Francisco, presenting devs with a dizzying array of possibilities: a new design language for Android L; a boatload of new apps, APIs and SDKs; and expanded support for a variety of architectural and hardware configurations. "If I were a developer, I would feel real good about opportunities today," said ABI analyst Jeff Orr.

  • Google debuts Android L (5.0), plus wearable, auto, TV versions

    At Google I/O, Google previewed Android 5.0′s new UI, and also unveiled Android TV and Android Auto, while offering new details on Android Wear.

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