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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • Whatever Happened To Torchlight On Linux UPDATED

    Torchlight came out for Linux in September of 2012 via Humble Indie Bundle 6. It has since been available for Linux users only in the Ubuntu Software Centre which hardly encompasses all Linux users.

  • Mount & Blade: Warband Now In Beta For Linux
  • Day 8 of Steam Summer Sale 2014 Brings Discounts for Three Major Linux Games
  • SteamOS: interviews and review

    After years of rumours, months of teasing and weeks of waiting, SteamOS is finally here. The beta release of the gaming distro signalled the start of Valve’s tentative entry into the hardware market. The same day as the release, the first wave of Valve’s own Steam Machines went out. These beta units, while never truly meant to grace store shelves, are the first examples of many more third-party offerings to come. This massive step from Valve is making waves around the tech and games world, so we decided to talk to a few of the people that could help us truly understand the position Valve is in, and what their next move might be.

  • Unreal Tournament Is Coming Along, New Video Update

    The developers of Unreal Tournament have another update in store for us and it sounds like it's all coming together very nicely. If you have been living under a rock the new one is confirmed for Linux.

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Android Leftovers

3 tips for organizing your open source project's workflow on GitHub

Managing an open source project is challenging work, and the challenges grow as a project grows. Eventually, a project may need to meet different requirements and span multiple repositories. These problems aren't technical, but they are important to solve to scale a technical project. Business process management methodologies such as agile and kanban bring a method to the madness. Developers and managers can make realistic decisions for estimating deadlines and team bandwidth with an organized development focus. Read more

How will the GDPR impact open source communities?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was approved by the EU Parliament on April 14, 2016, and will be enforced beginning May 25, 2018. The GDPR replaces the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC which was designed "to harmonize data privacy laws across Europe, to protect and empower all EU citizens data privacy and to reshape the way organizations across the region approach data privacy." The aim of the GDPR is to protect the personal data of individuals in the EU in an increasingly data-driven world. Read more