Learning Linux the Easy Way - With Cygwin

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HowTos

If you work in tech support, your PC is your life. When it’s running well, you’re making money. So what do you do when you hear about Linux? Yes, it’d be great to have a Linux system to tinker with, but all your machinery is taken. You read the how-to documents and the chief Linux documentation source, and they suggest adding a partition manager and freeing up raw disk space for Linux. But what if it doesn’t work? What if the partition app scrambles your hard drive and forces a total system rebuild? Is there a way to have a Linux environment for tinkering that doesn’t put your PC at risk? What if you don’t want to pursue Linux after testing it? What if you want a de-installation process—as nice as the ones you’re used to with Windows?

This article shows you how to set up a Linux environment on your current Windows PC. The installation is easy, and the removal is just as nice. If you want an easy way to try Linux, you’ll find that Cygwin, the tool I describe, is a perfect way to get many UNIX tools for free.

Cygwin Installation

Let’s get started with the installation.

Full Story.

Yeah Right

Yeah, having Unix tools available on your windows box is EXACTLY THE SAME as learning Linux - NOT.

Yeah, and you can learn how to be a car designer with a cresent wrench and a loose bike chain to practice on.

If you can't afford another box to install Linux on, or find a hand-me-down box to install Linux on, or get another hard drive to install Linux on, or Dual-Boot your existing system to install Linux on, what the heck do you want to learn Linux for????

Cygwin is kind of cool - but to say you can use it to LEARN LINUX is a bunch of BS.

???

I tend to agree with vonskippy.

Why not just install VMWare Server (which is free) and install Linux on a virtual machine? (That's what I did to make the transition to Linux).

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