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The 2006 LinuxWorld Canada Show

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Linux

In 2005, the Toronto Linux User Group had a booth at the LinuxWorld Canada Show at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, and this worked out very well for the group, as I noted in my article about the 2005 show (www.linuxjournal.com/article/8262). In planning for this year's show, our group looked at what went well and what could have been done better. Things that were done well included over-staffing the booth so that at any given time many of the volunteers could be looking at the other booths, drinking the show in. In the not so good category was the consensus that electrical power in the booth wasn't worth what the convention center charged us. In the "just different" category, during the past year as an organization, the Toronto Linux User Group had legally changed names to become the Greater Toronto Area Linux User Group (GTALUG), meaning that the banner and paperwork from last year could not be reused.

Many in our group love swag--free stuff to get and/or to give away. So, when planning for the show, the question came up as to how we could give stuff away on an effectively zero budget. I approached several Linux distributors asking for CD-ROM and/or DVD-ROM disks.

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