Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interview with Robert Shingledecker and John Andrews, Damn Small Linux

Filed under
Interviews

In a somewhat surprise move, the developers of Damn Small Linux have announced a new edition of their popular mini-distribution for older computers - DSL-N, or "Damn Small Linux Not". Although they have always insisted that their goal is to create an operating system that would fit within a 50MB CD size limit, this requirement has placed a severe restriction on their development effort. Software is getting bigger and users have different preferences for the kind of software they need on a CD, especially if it is meant to run on a more archaic hardware. As a result, a 70MB DSL-N has been born. The two lead developers, Robert Shingledecker (on the left) and John Andrews, have kindly agreed to answer a few questions about the new product.

DW: John, Robert, thank you very much for your time. Can you please introduce yourselves? How old are you and where do you live?

RS: I'm Robert Shingledecker. I am 56 and reside in Southern California. I have been an early pioneer deploying Linux at the City of Garden Grove in the mid-nineties. I also have been the CTO for several "dotcoms" and have built many Linux-based appliances. I have been involved with computers and programming since 1971.

JA: I'm John Andrews, 34, born and raised in Northern California. My path to Open Source software is really rooted in self-guided exploration. I have no formal computer or software training, all the coding I've done over the years is self-taught. I also started late, getting my first computer in 1996, but I was quickly drawn to open source software and wanted to learn as much as I could. Like many self-directed geeks, I started by wanting to know what made things work. Over the years I've grown to love simplicity and functionality above all else in software.

DW: Have you two ever met or do you cooperate exclusively on the Internet?

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Arch Linux – Kde Plasma 5.3 stable is finally available for installation

Great news for Arch Linux users! From a few minutes, Kde Plasma 5.3 stable packages are officially available on Arch Linux repositories. In fact, after running the pacman -Syu command I finally noticed, listed on my terminal, the new packages of Plasma 5.3.0 with all the relative dependencies. Read more

Linux 4.1-rc2

So the -rc2's have lately been pretty small - looking more like late -rc's than early ones. It *used* to be that I couldn't even post the shortlog, because it was just too big. That's not been the case for the last few releases. I think people tend to take a breather after the merge window, because the -rc3's tend to then be a bit bigger again. But it may just also be that I've just gotten much better at saying "the merge window is over, I'm not taking random stragglers", or that people are just getting better at keeping to the merge window. Whatever the reason, the time of huge -rc2's seems to be happily behind us. Read more

GNOME 3.17.1 released

Hi GNOMErs! The development of the next GNOME release, 3.17, has started, and the first snapshot, 3.17.1, is now available. To compile GNOME 3.17.1, you can use the jhbuild [1] modulesets [2] (which use the exact tarball versions from the official release). [1] http://library.gnome.org/devel/jhbuild/ [2] http://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.17.1/ The release notes that describe the changes between 3.16.1 and 3.17.1 are available. Go read them to learn what's new in this release: core - http://download.gnome.org/core/3.17/3.17.1/NEWS apps - http://download.gnome.org/apps/3.17/3.17.1/NEWS The GNOME 3.17.1 release is available here: core sources - http://download.gnome.org/core/3.17/3.17.1 apps sources - http://download.gnome.org/apps/3.17/3.17.1 Read more