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FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report - Second Quarter 2014

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BSD

The Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) provides boot- and
run-time services for x86 and other computers. For the x86 architecture
it replaces the legacy BIOS. This project will adapt the FreeBSD loader
and kernel boot process for compatibility with UEFI firmware, found on
contemporary servers, desktops, and laptops.

Ed and Nathan completed a number of integration tasks over the past
three months. Nathan added a first-stage loader, boot1.efi, to support
chain-loading the rest of the system from a UFS filesystem. This allows
the UEFI boot process to proceed in a similar fashion as with BIOS
boot. Nathan also added UEFI support to the FreeBSD installer and
release image creation script.

The EFI framebuffer requires the vt(4) system console -- a framebuffer
driver is not implemented for the legacy syscons(4) console. Ed added
automatic vt(4) selection to the UEFI boot path.

Snapshots are now built as dual-mode images, and should boot via both
BIOS and UEFI. Our plan is to merge the UEFI and vt(4) work to
stable/10 to appear in FreeBSD 10.1-RELEASE.

This project is sponsored by The FreeBSD Foundation.

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