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Mini-Review: Open source handheld gaming device: GP2X

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Gaming

Dynamism sent me the GP2X-F100 Personal Entertainment Player to play around with. If you're not familiar with the unit, it's a Linux-based device manufactured by Gamepark Holdings co., Ltd which is made from the ground up for Open Source tinkering. Built into the package is a 240Mhz dual-core CPU, 64 MB of RAM, 64 MB of NAND, 320x240 backlit LCD, and a TV out. It has video and audio playback support, which pretty much plays any format out of the box, without requiring conversion. It runs off of two AA batteries for about 5 hours, and also supports AC power.

Once my upgrade was complete, I installed a bunch of emulators and have been enjoying a number of retro games on and off throughout the day. This is one great handheld!

To show you how much support this device already has, check out the file archives to see support for playing all types of ROMs (MAME, Sega Genesis, and Nintendo) and even some new 3-D games designed specifically for the device.

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