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Konqueror is looking for a maintainer

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Development
KDE

For quite some time now (OK, many years...) I haven't had time for Konqueror.
KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt 5 have kept me quite busy.

It's time to face the facts: Konqueror needs a new maintainer.

This is a good time to publish the thoughts we had many years ago about a possible new GUI for Konqueror.

Kévin Ottens, Nuno Pinheiro and myself had a meeting (at some Akademy, many years ago) where we thought about how Konqueror's GUI could be improved to be cleaner and more intuitive, while keeping the idea of Konqueror being the universal navigator, i.e. the swiss-army knife that includes file management, web browsing, document viewing, and more. This is what makes it different from rekonq and dolphin, for instance.

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