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SUSE Linux 10.1 Final Report

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XGL

XGL has been available for 10.1 from early in the development cycle. At first packages required separate downloading and individual installation. Later on they became available on the install disks. Novell had published a guide to setup XGL on their system, but my testing on several developmental versions failed. Others had better luck. Towards the end of April Novell published a newer more complete XGL configuration guide here and this release, I had much better luck. This guide is step by step, copy & paste, complete and accurate enough that anyone can have XGL on their nice shiny new system. As some of the instructions are to be executed from outside of X, I made a little file that could be easily cat'd from the terminal. In addition, I issued the gpm command in order to facilitate copy and paste. For me the command was gpm -m /dev/input/mice -t imps2

    

As you might notice, Novell has included instructions for setting up XGL on both the Gnome and KDE desktops. This is an exciting advancement as most distros that include XGL, do so only for Gnome. As KDE is my desktop of choice, this was very welcome. As stated, I just followed the instruction on the above linked site and XGL functioned fairly well. The KDE configuration required just the making of a .desktop file for the Autostart folder over the general system-wide setup. I did have to do a hard reboot in order to get X to restart and some of the listed commands didn't work, but many did. Those that worked include rotating the cube by mouse or keyboard, tilting and rotating by mouse, warping windows, animated menus, translucent window adjustments, and zoom in and out manually.

        

The Gnome configuration was just as easy as the KDE setup. In fact, all the features worked upon starting Gnome anyway and going thru the setup didn't enable any others. I went through their setup instructions for good measure. As stated some of the listed functions didn't work. Some of these include: Scaling, resizing windows, and zoom once. One general XGL feature missing completely was the F12 - arranging and view all of the open windows. This is actually my favorite XGL feature.

        

Conclusion

All in all, SUSE 10.1 rocks. It is solid, stable, and professional. It is feature rich and thus lacks very little. With its new features like AppArmor and XGL, SUSE is ahead of the competition. Missing multimedia support is a major drawback, especially for new window converts. Its Software Manager is still demonstrating minor glitches can be quite annoying. The whole Software Management suite is a bit confusing with the separate modules with overlapping functionality. The kernel is a very new version, but KDE and Gnome are already almost considered outdated with KDE 3.5.1 being used over the 3.5.2 that's been out for a coupla months and similarly for the included Gnome 2.12 verses the latest Gnome 2.1.4. But weighing these few complaints against all the features, stability, and overall look & feel & functionality, SUSE still comes out King of Hill. They are the top of the pyramid and the cream of the crop.

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some wireless

I just read a report that stated some wireless devices are also broken in 10.1 due to the removal of proprietary drivers. The end-user will now need to supply such drivers themselves, which aren't exactly newbie friendly. Sad

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Gaming and Wireless

I've got cedega running and games installed with it. Try adding a line in fstab to mount your cd/dvd device (look at http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-amd64.xml?part=1&chap=8 this is the same regardless of gentoo or amd64). Then just have SuSE ignore disks when you put them into the drive. Cedega's mount function will then work. Note the common mistake that users have not mkdir'ed the mount directory that is listed in fstab.

If you've got an Atheos based wireless card, or any other card as listed by madwifi.org, then get the SuSE 10.1 specific driver rpms and source rpms from http://madwifi.org/suse/.

Another terrific review

Best review yet--thanks!

I'm in process of installing 10.1 on a student workstation in the Computer Science lab at the high school where I teach. Main High School Servers are Novell Netware, so, as a workstation client, I'll be checking OpenSuse's netware connectivity.

Later, I'll be testing OpenSuse as a Local classroom server. Will report back after I work through this process.
Regards,
Gary Frankenbery

Re: Another terrific review

gfranken wrote:

Best review yet--thanks!

Thanks so much for saying. I wondered, as nobody linked to it. Tongue

gfranken wrote:

I'm in process of installing 10.1 ... Will report back after I work through this process.

Yippee! I hope that means what I think it means. Smile

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