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Gentoo 2006.0: Elbow grease required

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Gentoo
Reviews

I've been toying with Gentoo 2006.0 off and on since it was released in February. Gentoo is a solid distribution, but it takes a little more work than most users might expect to get the distribution up and running.

Installing Gentoo using the manual method described in the Gentoo Handbook is, to put it bluntly, a royal pain. It's a good hands-on experience if you're looking to learn about the nitty-gritty of system configuration, but a lousy way to install Linux quickly, and almost certain to be intimidating for anyone who's not well-versed with Linux already.

I recommend that anyone interested in learning about Linux try the manual Gentoo installation once -- and then give thanks that all of that silliness is no longer required just to get a system up and running because we have much more advanced installers now.
I was interested when I read that this version of Gentoo had a graphical installer, but my hopes fell when I read the welcome greeting for the GUI installer:

It is highly recommended that you have gone through the manual install process a time or two, or at least read through the install guide. The purpose of this installer is not to make the install easier but to make it quicker. Don't ask questions that are covered by the install guide, or we shall taunt you a second time.

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