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Future of the GPL

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OSS

Stephen Shankland has written an interesting read of the current re-vamping of the General Public License governing Linux distributions and much of the associated software. Highlights include how to intermingle open source and proprietary software and some of the big players positions.

One quote includes, "But the legal scrutiny, while burgeoning, isn't alien to the GPL. When Stallman launched his Gnu's Not Unix, or GNU, effort to clone Unix in the 1980s, he crafted the first GPL not just to govern the software but also to try to create a legal framework that would guarantee that GNU would never be fettered by proprietary shackles."

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