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Linux goes after the desktop

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Linux

A WIDELY backed effort is under way to create a standard Linux desktop to help break Microsoft's stranglehold.

The Free Standards Group, which is backed by at least 14 software makers, aims to make it easier for developers to write applications that will work on different versions of Linux.

AMD, Asianux, CA, Dell, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Intel, Mandriva, Novell, RealNetworks, Red Flag, Red Hat, Turbolinux, Xandros and others have thrown their weight behind the Linux Standard Base.
The group has released LSB 3.1, the first version to include support for portable Linux desktop applications.

LSB 3.1 incorporates the recently approved ISO standard LSB Core (ISO/IEC 23360).

It is an effort to create a single starting point for Linux distributions based on standard elements.

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