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Open source can’t always be open to all

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OSS

An open source software company is something of a paradox. On the one hand, it has to convince customers that software is becoming increasingly commoditised, that proprietary software is limiting and expensive, and that standards-based, community-developed and community-supported open source software is the way to go.

On the other hand, an open source company has to persuade those same customers that they should pay for the use of that same software.

It stands to reason that not every open source company will become a successful business in the long term. Likewise, the business models around open source must continue to evolve to match the changing nature of the market.

When that next wave of open source companies hits, Scott Yara, president and co-founder of Greenplum, wants to be riding the crest. Of course, it helps when your commercial open source solution is considerably less expensive than its best-known competitor.

Full Story.

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