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Interview with Miklós Vajna, Frugalware Linux

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Frugalware Linux is one of those distributions that does not feature often in the news headlines. But those users who take the time give it more than just a passing glance are often surprised to find in Frugalware a clean, fast distribution with a great package manager and a few convenient system administration tools. Loosely modelled on Slackware and incorporating Arch's 'pacman' for managing installed applications, Frugalware Linux is not only a great operating system, it is also an active community project based on open source ideals. We have asked Miklós Vajna, the distribution's founder, a few questions about the history of the project and where it is heading.

* * * * *

DW: Miklós, thank you very much for your time. Firstly, please tell us about yourself. How old are you? Where do you live? What do you do for living?

MV: I'm 20 years old. I live in Hungary. I'm currently studying at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics.

DW: When did you start using Linux and why? What distributions did you use before launching Frugalware?

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