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Rough Start For Google's Summer of Code '06

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Google

They waited in IRC. They waited by their inboxes. They waited for Google to accept them.

And nearly 1,800 applicants of Google's Summer of Code 2006 finally got word their projects were accepted. Then came the rude awakening.

"We sent about 1,800 e-mails that said that people were accepted who in fact were not," Google's Open Source Program Manager Chris DiBona wrote in a mailing list posting.

"We're very deeply sorry for this. If you received two e-mails, one that said you were accepted and one that you were not, this means you were not."

The Google Summer of Code 2006 e-mails were sent very early this morning, as project applicants had been expecting the official word from Google on May 23.

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